Strong voice comes from founder of Southern Poverty Law Center

It's 2017. But the fight for justice and tolerance has never been abandoned, thanks to an Alabama-born lawyer who, when still in his boyhood, tells his story "as the son of a poor Alabama cotton farmer who witnessed grave injustices," against "my African American neighbors and was inspired to earn my law degree so that I could fight for the rights of those with no other champions."
In his autobiography, Morris Dees says: "I was honored when the American BarAssociation chose to publish my book as the first in a series about lawyer spursuing justice."
The aforesaid book, "A Lawyer's Journey," relates how the author worked on his cases that came to him "over the past 40 years,"as Dees considers how "blessed" he has been in carrying out his work with lawyers, investigators, and others "who have a real passion for justice."
The Center, founded in 1971, modestly described by Dees as having "brought tough challenges and unforgettable moments of triumph," was responsible for putting up the fight against the United Klans of America who were found"liable in the lynching death of a black teen."
"I'll never forget the day I stood with our staff in a Mobile, Alabama courtroom as an all-white jury found the aforementioned 'United Klans of America' liable.
"It was poetic justice when the group was forced to turn over the deed to its national headquarters to the victim's mother."
Dees recounts another experience in his fight against racial injustice.
"Equally memorable was the day I walked through the ashes of our building after it was firebombed by the Klan. Not a single employee quit because of that arson.Instead, we rebuilt and we grew stronger than ever.
"And there was the heartbreaking moment when I held my sobbing young daughter in 1984while Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agents and guards searched the woods around our home for armed intruders who were determined to stop our work for justice, equality and tolerance."
Standing out as one of the Center's humble pride is how it does not receive government funds and accepts 'no fees' from clients who have been recipients of assistance.
The Center is financially supported by those who are called the Friends of the Center; each supporter believes in the fight for justice and tolerance through pledging 'modest amounts' each month to cover legal and educational programs.
Interestingly, the Friends of the Center provide the financial security of the organization's cause.
The founder says how 'impossible' it is to predict how 'lengthy' or how 'costly,'their 'legal actions' will be.
Dees amplified his statement when he pointed out how one case the Center won, lasted more than 20 years.
The Center has a Teaching Tolerance staff dedicated to spreading the message of tolerance and changing the 'hearts of young people across the country.'
Awe-inspiring is learning about how the Center's lawyers and investigators have pledged to fight for justice in court, no matter how long the hours or how difficult and dangerous the work would entail.
In sum, the author's autobiography is a modest but significant contribution that led Dees to the front lines of the civil rights struggle and his ongoing crusade opposing hate groups.
In A Lawyer's Journey, it narrates how a courageous and often lonely journey of a skilled and described 'controversial trial lawyer,' does parallel the nation's struggle to ensure freedom and equality for its citizenry.

Read more...

What was never predicted: A 'first' ever in Oscar history

The team for what was called the 'odds-on' favorite musical "La La Land," was conveying its numerous 'thank-you' greetings on stage; but in a few minutes, there was an announcement that presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway had called on the wrong winner.
"Moonlight," categorized as the 'underdog coming-of-age story,' was the correct winner.
An apology emanated from the accountants, Price Waterhouse Cooper.
What called attention to "Moonlight" was the diversity of the prize-winning picture, which included Mahershala Ali, the first Muslim actor to win the award as best supporting actor.
As he opened the program, Jimmy Kimmel, the Oscars host, poked fun at President Trump.
The show's late-night host evidently did not keep himself away from calling one Oscar-winner Mel Gibson, whom Kimmel called "the only one 'Braveheart' in the room.
"And he's not going to unite us either," the host added in the midst of laughter that filled the audience.
Kimmel turned serious when he stated that if each one watching right now "took a moment to reach out to one person you disagree with and have a positive, considerate conversation...we could really make America great again."
His initial crack on Trump was to thank him because. "remember when last year the Oscars were considered racist?"
Returning to the Oscar winners: "Moonlight" was known to have 'the devastating vulnerability of its protagonist, and filmmaker Barry Jenkins' brilliant writing and visionary direction.'
What was usually related to past Academy Award winners reflected artistic excellence. Yet, in recent years, subtlety has been part of the awardees as they accepted their respective acclaims: how America's identity is being disseminated around the globe.
As word has been heard from various film critics, the year's Oscars were 'guaranteed' to be more 'inclusive' than in past years.
Seven actors of color received nominations for their performances; those that came up for 'best picture,' aside from "Moonlight," were "Hidden Figures," and "Fences."
Films about the white working class: "Hell or High Water;" "Manchester by the Sea;" "Hacksaw Ridge," a female 'academic' dealing with extraterrestrial visitors; "Arrival," a little boy on his own as he survived in India via "Lion." Not to forget, how about the numbers of those 'kids' singing and dancing that made "La La Land" the way it turned out to be?
"Manchester by the Sea," is indeed lauded for being a 'masterpiece of screenwriting,' hence, the star Casey Affleck, who garnered 'the best actor of the year,' award did not come as a surprise at all.
"Fences" star, Viola Davis, who won the Oscar for her supporting role underscored her country's earned reputation: the United States remains in the forefront: as a champion of fairness, humanism and self-awareness. May the latter description of America be perpetuated, was the essence of Davis' performance.
The emceeing role of Kimmel closed with: "Some of you will win tonight and give a speech that the president of the U.S. will tweet about in all caps."
As what was never expected: "Moonlight" won the best picture after "La La Land' had been announced mistakenly.
The error, fortunately, was corrected as fast as change on the stage could muster.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed
×

Sign up to keep in touch!

Be the first to hear about special offers and exclusive deals from TechNews and our partners.

Check out our Privacy Policy & Terms of use
You can unsubscribe from email list at any time