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William, Harry had ‘short’ chat with Diana on day she died

LONDON: Britain’s Prince William and Prince Harry have revealed they talked to their mother Princess Diana on the day she died and that the “short” conversation now weighs “heavily” on their mind. “It was her speaking from Paris, I can’t really necessarily remember what I said but all I do remember is probably regretting for the rest of my life how short the phone call was,” Prince Harry told ITV for a documentary to commemorate their mother. Prince William was just 15 and his brother Harry 12 when their mother and her boyfriend Dodi Al-Fayed were killed in August 1997 after the car they were in crashed in a tunnel in central Paris as it was being pursued at high speed by press photographers. Their French chauffeur Henri Paul, who was later found to be over the legal blood alcohol limit, also died. The two princes were in Balmoral, the queen’s residence in the Scottish Highlands, and William had earlier told Diana of the “very good time” they were having. “Harry and I were in a desperate rush to say goodbye, you know ‘see you later’…if I’d known now obviously what was going to happen I wouldn’t have been so blase about it and everything else,” William told ITV. “But that phone call sticks in my mind, quite heavily.” To mark the 20th anniversary of her death, the princes announced earlier this year they were setting up a committee to raise funds to pay for a statue of Diana, who was known as the Princess of Wales. The statue is to be erected in the public gardens of Kensington Palace in London, where she lived.

Flash flood sweeps through Coverack in Cornwall

-BBC

Flash flooding has seen torrents of water sweep through a Cornish village.
Residents in Coverack, on the Lizard Peninsula, have reported roads being blocked and hailstones the size of 50 pence pieces smashing windows.
Heavy rainfall hit at about 15:00 BST and the coastguard airlifted two people trapped on the roof of a house. Four people remained in the building.
Emergency services have asked people to avoid the area and not attempt to drive through any flood water.
Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service said its crews were attending "multiple flooding-related incidents" and urged people to "avoid this area".
Gloria Knight, who lives on a hill above Coverack, said her garden became 'like a waterfall'
Cornwall Council said the first calls about the flooding were received about 15:40. One person was reported to be trapped in an outbuilding and six people were on the roof of their property.
A major incident was declared at 17:20 and the helicopter was deployed to rescue the people trapped on the roof.
About 50 properties are estimated to be affected by the flooding, but no injuries have been reported.
The road into Coverack is currently impassable .
With the latest information from the Met Office suggesting there is a risk of further heavy rain, people were asked to drive carefully and not to go though flood water.
'Flood of water'
A spokeswoman for the Maritime and Coastguard Agency said a helicopter was sent from Newquay.
She said: "Six people were in a house and two have been rescued from the house by helicopter."
Karla Wainwright, who works at the Paris Hotel, said: "This afternoon we could tell it was going to get about stormy, then about 3pm it hit.
"There were hailstones as big as 50p pieces and a lot of small panes in our windows are broken."
Ms Wainwright said the storm continued for an hour and a half.
"Once it cleared off then we could see a massive flood of water coming down the main way into Coverack."
Water ran through the village before crashing over cliffs and into the sea
Bill Magill, who owns the nearby White Hart Hotel, said the water was "over a foot high" in some areas.
"It was nothing like I've ever known in this area, we were totally unprepared for it and it was totally unexpected," he said.
"[It was] racing down a little country lane, pouring over the banks like these waterfalls."
'Cut in half'
The Met Office said the flood followed heavy thunderstorms and rain in Cornwall and Devon on Tuesday afternoon.
Bill Frisken, a local councillor in Coverack, said he could not access the centre of the village because the main road is underwater.
Describing the speed with which the flood hit, he said: "It was almost instantaneous."
"The village has effectively been cut in half, you can't cross the river," he added.
Mr Frisken said he and his wife had to bail water out of their kitchen, while their garage was also flooded.
"It was several feet of water coming down and pouring into the house. The depth of water was immense."
Another witness said: "I have never seen such big hails. The sun was shining and the wind was blowing and it was hailing, all at the same time.
"It was quite amazing really."

Giant iceberg splits from Antarctic

By Jonathan Amos
BBC Science Correspondent

Image: Larsen C crackImage copyrightBAS
It's currently mid-winter in the Antarctic. The berg-producing crack was last filmed in the summer
One of the biggest icebergs ever recorded has just broken away from Antarctica.
The giant block is estimated to cover an area of roughly 6,000 sq km; that's about a quarter the size of Wales.
An US satellite observed the berg on Wednesday while passing over a region known as the Larsen C Ice Shelf.
Scientists were expecting it. They'd been following the development of a large crack in Larsen's ice for more than a decade.
The rift's propagation had accelerated since 2014, making an imminent calving ever more likely.
The more than 200m-thick tabular berg will not move very far, very fast in the short term. But it will need to be monitored. Currents and winds might eventually push it north of the Antarctic where it could become a hazard to shipping.
An infrared sensor on the American space agency's Aqua satellite spied clear water in the rift between the shelf and the berg on Wednesday. The water is warmer relative to the surrounding ice and air - both of which are sub-zero.
"The rift was barely visible in these data in recent weeks, but the signature is so clear now that it must have opened considerably along its whole length," explained Prof Adrian Luckman, whose Project Midas at Swansea University has followed the berg's evolution most closely.
The European Sentinel-1 satellite-radar system should also have acquired imagery in recent hours to confirm the break. Sentinel can sense any changes in the giant block's motion relative to the shelf.
How does it compare with past bergs?
The new Larsen berg is probably in the top 10 biggest ever recorded, but it is no match for some of the true monsters that have been witnessed in the Antarctic.
The largest observed in the satellite era was an object called B-15. It came away from the Ross Ice Shelf in 2000 and measured some 11,000 sq km. Six years later, fragments of this super-berg still persisted and passed by New Zealand.
In 1956, it was reported that a US Navy icebreaker had encountered an object of roughly 32,000 sq km. That is bigger than Belgium. Unfortunately, there were no satellites at the time to follow up and verify the observation.
It has been known also for the Larsen C Ice Shelf itself to spawn bigger bergs. An object measuring some 9,000 sq km came away in 1986. Many of Larsen's progeny can get wound up in a gyre in the Weddell sea or can be despatched north on currents into the Southern Ocean, and even into the South Atlantic.
A good number of bergs from this sector can end up being caught on the shallow continental shelf around the British overseas territory of South Georgia where they gradually wither away.

Media captionHelen Fricker: "Iceberg calving is the natural background mass-loss process"
What is the significance of the calving?
In and of itself, probably very little. The Larsen C shelf is a mass of floating ice formed by glaciers that have flowed down off the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula into the ocean. On entering the water, their buoyant fronts lift up and join together to make a single protrusion.
The calving of bergs at the forward edge of the shelf is a very natural behaviour. The shelf likes to maintain an equilibrium and the ejection of bergs is one way it balances the accumulation of mass from snowfall and the input of more ice from the feeding glaciers on land.
That said, scientists think Larsen C is now at its smallest extent since the end of the last ice age some 11,700 years ago, and about 10 other shelves further to the north along the Peninsula have either collapsed or greatly retreated in recent decades.
The two nearby, smaller shelves, Larsen A and Larsen B, disintegrated around the turn of the century; and a warming climate very probably had a role in their demise.
But Larsen C today does not look like its siblings. Prof Helen Fricker, from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told BBC News: "The signs we saw at Larsen A and B - we're not seeing yet. The thinning we saw for Larsen A and B - we're not seeing. And we're not seeing any evidence for large volumes of surface meltwater on the order of what you would need to hydro-fracture the ice shelf.
"Most glaciologists are not particularly alarmed by what's going on at Larsen C, yet. It's business as usual."
Map
Researchers will be looking to see how the shelf responds in the coming years; to see how well it maintains a stable configuration, and if its calving rate changes.
There was some keen interest a while back when the crack, which spread across the shelf from a pinning point known as the Gipps Ice Rise, looked as though it might sweep around behind another such anchor called the Bawden Ice Rise. Had that happened, it could have prompted a significant speed-up in the shelf's seaward movement once the berg came off.
As it is, scientists are not now expecting a big change in the speed of the ice.
One fascinating focus for future study will be a strip of "warm", malleable ice that runs east-west through the shelf, reaching the ocean edge about 100km north from the Gipps Ice Rise. This strip is referred to as the Joerg suture zone. There is a large queue of cracks held behind it.
"Calving of the iceberg is not likely itself to make the existing cracks at the Joerg Peninsula suture zone more likely to jump across this boundary," observed Chris Borstad, from the University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS).
"At this stage we really don't know whether there is some larger-scale process that might be weakening this zone, like ocean melting at the base of the shelf, or whether the current rift was just a random or episodic event that was bound to happen at some point.
"We know that rifts like this periodically propagate and cause large tabular icebergs to break from ice shelves, even in the absence of any climate-driven changes.
"I am working with a number of colleagues to design field experiments on Larsen C to answer this specific question (by measuring the properties of the Joerg suture zone directly). But until we get down there and take some more measurements we can only speculate."

Activists riot against G-20 summit for 3rd night in Hamburg

(Associated Press)

Photo:Policemen stand behind a burning barricade in the so-called 'Schanzenviertel' area, on the sidelines of the G-20 summit, early Sunday, July 9, 2017, in Hamburg. Rioters set up street barricades, looted supermarkets and attacked police with slingshots and firebombs. (Daniel Bockwoldt/dpa via AP)

HAMBURG — Anti-globalization activists rioted for a third consecutive night in Hamburg early yesterday even after Group of 20 leaders had already left the port city in northern Germany.

Police again used water cannon trucks against rioters attacking them with iron rods and pavement stones. They arrested 186 protesters and temporarily detained another 225 people. Officials say 476 officers have been injured in the violence since Thursday. The number of injured protesters wasn't clear.

Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel condemned the violence, saying "Germany's reputation is severely affected internationally by the events in Hamburg."

Gabriel told the Bild am Sonntag newspaper that a Europe-wide investigative team should search for suspects.

Hamburg's police president Ralf Meyer told reporters at a news conference that while he was proud of the 20,000 police officers who managed to provide security for the many international leaders and their delegations, it was deplorable that so many of them were injured and that the violent riots couldn't be prevented.

The city's interior minister said they hadn't expected this kind of brutality by leftist extremists.

"We had to deal — detached from the actual events at the summit — with ruthless acts of violence by criminals," Andy Grote said.

The city's officials reiterated that those who suffered from the destruction would quickly receive financial support from the government. Cars were torched, stores looted, bikes burned in street barricades and windows smashed during the three-day violence.

The overwhelming majority of the tens of thousands who took to the streets protested peacefully against the G-20 summit, demanding quicker action against global warming and more help for refugees.

The summit, which took place on Friday and Saturday, was hosted by German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Guests included President Donald Trump, Russian President Vladimir Putin and many other international leaders who held talks on contentious issues like climate, trade, terrorism and migration.

North Korea missile launch: Trump berates China on trade

-BBC

Photo: Missiles fired during US-South Korea drills serve as warning to North Korea


Donald Trump has criticised China following North Korea's test of a long-range missile, condemning it for increasing trade with Pyongyang.
"So much for China working with us," the US president tweeted.
The US and South Korea conducted a ballistic missile fire exercise in the Sea of Japan in response to the North.
China and Russia have urged both sides to stop flexing their military muscle and said they oppose any attempts at regime change in North Korea.
"It is perfectly clear to Russia and China that any attempts to justify the use of force by referring to [United Nations] Security Council resolutions are unacceptable, and will lead to unpredictable consequences in this region which borders both the Russian Federation and the People's Republic of China," Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said.
"Attempts to strangle the DPRK [North Korea] economically are equally unacceptable," he added.
The missile launch, the latest in a series of tests, was in defiance of a ban by the UN Security Council.
The US has asked for an urgent meeting of the Security Council to discuss the issue. A closed-door session of the 15-member body will take place later on Wednesday.
Donald Trump and Melania Trump depart for travel to Poland and the upcoming G-20 summit in Germany, from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S. (July 5, 2017)Image copyrightREUTERS
The US president held talks with China's leader Xi Jinping at his Mar-a-Lago retreat in Florida in April.
Mr Trump hailed "tremendous progress" with China after those meetings.
The trade figures showing an increase in trade between China and North Korea, which he was apparently referring to in Wednesday's critical tweet, cover the period before that April meeting.
The US president is now en route to Poland and Germany, where he will meet Mr Xi for the second time.
Is the new missile test a game-changer?
Can the US defend itself against N Korea?
China, which is Pyongyang's main economic ally, and Russia have called on North Korea to suspend its ballistic missile programme in exchange for a halt on the large-scale military exercises by the US and South Korea.
Mr Xi and Russian President Vladimir Putin, who met in Moscow on Tuesday, said "the opposing sides should start negotiations".
Japan on Tuesday said "repeated provocations like this are absolutely unacceptable" and lodged a protest.
Possible solutions to crisis
What has North Korea said?
Tuesday's launch was North Korea's first-ever test launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).
State news agency KCNA quoted leader Kim Jong-un as saying the test was a "gift" to the Americans on their independence day.
The report warned of the possibility of more tests, saying he ordered officials to "frequently send big and small 'gift packages' to the Yankees".
Pyongyang said earlier the Hwasong-14 ICBM had reached an altitude of 2,802km (1,731 miles) and flew 933km for 39 minutes before hitting a target in the sea.
Have North Korea's missile tests paid off?
North Korea, it said, was now "a full-fledged nuclear power that has been possessed of the most powerful inter-continental ballistic rocket capable of hitting any part of the world".
Grey line
What is an ICBM?
ICBM flight track
A long-range missile usually designed to carry a nuclear warhead
The minimum range is 5,500km (3,400 miles), although most fly about 10,000km or more
Pyongyang has previously displayed two types of ICBMs: the KN-08, with a range of 11,500km, and the KN-14, with a range of 10,000km, but before 4 July had not claimed to have flight tested an ICBM. It is not clear what differentiates the Hwasong-14
North Korea's missile programme in detail
Grey line
Does North Korea really have a long-range weapon now?
Some experts believe that Tuesday's test proves that North Korea has a missile that could travel across the globe and reach Alaska.
Map showing estimates of North Korean missile ranges
Physicist David Wright said it could reach a maximum range of about 6,700km on a standard trajectory, while South Korea's defence ministry on Wednesday put the range between 7,000 and 8,000km.
But whether that missile could deliver a warhead is still a question.
Pyongyang claimed the rocket carried a "heavy warhead" and that it "accurately hit the targeted waters without any structural breakdown".
South Korea said there was no evidence proving the missile could withstand high temperatures and successfully re-enter the atmosphere, reported Yonhap news agency.
Experts believe Pyongyang does not yet have the capability to miniaturise a nuclear warhead, fit it onto a long-range missile, and ensure it is protected until delivery to the target.
They say many of North Korea's missiles cannot accurately hit targets.
But others believe that at the rate it is going, Pyongyang may overcome these challenges and develop a nuclear weapon that could strike the US within five to 10 years.
How advanced is North Korea's nuclear programme?
Grey line
What now for Washington? - Dr John Nilsson-Wright, Chatham House
The intercontinental ballistic missile Hwasong-14 is seen during its test launch in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang, 4 July 2017Image copyrightKCNA
Image caption
North Korean media released this image of Tuesday's missile launch
By bringing Alaska within range, the new missile test is an unambiguous game-changer in both symbolical and practical terms.
US territory (albeit separate from the contiguous continental US) is now finally within Pyongyang's cross-hairs.
For the first time a US president has to accept that the North poses a "real and present" danger not merely to north-east Asia and America's key allies - but to the US proper.
President Trump's weakness lies in having overplayed his hand too publicly and too loudly.

German bus inferno killed 18 in Bavaria, police say

BBC
Eighteen people are believed to have died when their tour bus crashed and burst into flames on the A9 motorway in southern Germany, police say.
The bus was in a collision with a lorry near Stammbach in north Bavaria.
Thirty people escaped the fire, two of whom are critically hurt. The bus was carrying German pensioners from Saxony.
Bavarian Interior Minister Joachim Herrmann said rescuers were delayed by "gawpers" driving slowly and by the intensity of the blaze.
It is not clear why the bus crashed - traffic was reportedly moving slowly at the time. Nor is it clear why flames engulfed the whole bus so quickly.
The lorry's trailer was also incinerated and the burnt-out wreck ended up a short distance ahead of the bus. The German news website Frankenpost reports that it was carrying mattresses and pillows.
The lorry driver was unharmed and told police the bus had crashed into his vehicle and burst into flames, it said.
There were 46 passengers and two drivers on the bus. One driver was among those killed. The passengers were men and women aged 41 to 81, from the Dresden area, heading to Lake Garda in Italy for a holiday.
Forensic teams have recovered the charred remains of 11 people so far.
Bavaria map showing crash site
Five rescue helicopters joined emergency workers at the scene.
Chancellor Angela Merkel said she was distressed by the accident and expressed sympathy for the injured and bereaved relatives.
She thanked the rescuers for looking after people "in an appalling situation".
A police spokesman told German news channel n-tv that there were good medical facilities in Bayreuth, not far from the scene.

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