Items filtered by date: Sunday, 13 August 2017

How Charlottesville Hasn’t Yet Changed The Confederate Monument Debate

White nationalists, alt-righters, and others march on Saturday in front of a Robert E. Lee statue scheduled for removal.

Saturday’s deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville came amid debate across the South about removing Confederate monuments and symbols. Did Charlottesville change how southern Republicans view that debate? BuzzFeed News asked more than 15 officials; only two responded.

 

 

A renewed fight to preserve Confederate symbols has escalated.

White supremacists and neo-Nazis were among those behind the violent, and — in at least one instance — deadly demonstrations this weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a statue commemorating Confederate army Gen. Robert E. Lee is targeted for removal next month.

To many offended by Confederate nostalgia, the images of swastikas and burning tiki torches confirmed what they have long believed: That racism, and not respect for history or a desire to lash out against liberals and politically correct culture, is fueling this debate.

It’s a debate with political ramifications, especially for Republicans. Some — notably Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel, House Speaker Paul Ryan, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, and Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado — have unequivocally denounced the Charlottesville unrest as racism and bigotry.

“We are the Party of Lincoln and a party that stands against divisive and hurtful symbols,” McDaniel said Sunday in statement to BuzzFeed News. “As Americans we can find ways to preserve our history but only if we are working toward an inclusive future that separates us from a hateful past.”

But President Donald Trump, whose campaign offered racialized rhetoric and never consistently disavowed his support among white nationalists, issued a response Saturday that did not call out white supremacists — and instead criticized the violence on “many sides,” while ignoring reporters’ shouted questions about white nationalists. His vague remarks underscore how uncomfortable a topic this is for others in the GOP, particularly those in the Old South, where politicians often are expected to pick a side.

How uncomfortable? BuzzFeed News contacted more than 15 Republican candidates, operatives, and officeholders in Southern states with the same basic question: Does seeing these symbols embraced in the name of racism and in a violent manner change how you feel about pro-Confederate politics? Only two replied. None answered the question as posed.

Those unheard from include Ed Gillespie, who in June narrowly beat a pro-Confederate candidate in Virginia’s Republican gubernatorial primary. The posturing by his rival, Corey Stewart, forced Gillespie to take a more explicit position on the Lee statue. (“No, Ed Gillespie doesn’t support removing Confederate monuments,” read the headline on a Gillespie campaign statement that pushed back on a Stewart claim.)

On Saturday, Gillespie condemned the “ugly events” in Charlottesville. “Having a right to spew vile hate does not make it right,” he said in a campaign statement. “These displays have no place in our Commonwealth, and the mentality on display is rejected by the decent, thoughtful and compassionate fellow Virginians I see every day.”

On Sunday, he went a step further: “We've seen evil in white supremacist torches and howling neo Naziism,” Gillespie said in a Twitter post honoring state troopers killed in a helicopter crash during the previous day’s unrest.

But a spokesperson did not respond to questions about whether the racism and violence in Charlottesville has prompted Gillespie to reconsider his position.

 
The silver Dodge Charger allegedly driven by James Alex Fields Jr. into a crowd of protesters and other cars that ultimately killed a woman and left more injured.
 
Getty Images

The silver Dodge Charger allegedly driven by James Alex Fields Jr. into a crowd of protesters and other cars that ultimately killed a woman and left more injured.

Others who did not respond:

  • Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey, who in May signed a bill that protects Confederate monuments in her state. Her spokespersons did not reply to emailed questions. Nor did representatives for Sen. Luther Strange, Rep. Mo Brooks, or former state Supreme Court chief justice Roy Moore — the three top contenders in the state’s closely watched special Senate primary. All three acknowledged the Charlottesville events on Twitter.
  • South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster, who succeeded Nikki Haley, one of the Confederate flag’s most prominent foes. Haley two years ago pulled the flag from Statehouse grounds after a racially motivated shooting at a black church. McMaster, who has faced criticism for his membership in an all-white country club, alluded to Haley’s efforts in a Saturday tweet: “South Carolina showed world her heart when confronted by hatred & violence. Pray for our brothers & sisters in Virginia.” A spokesperson did not reply to a request for additional comment.
  • Catherine Templeton, a past Haley cabinet member who is challenging McMaster in next year’s GOP gubernatorial primary. At a public forum this month, she pledged not to remove other Confederate symbols and lamented that “a bad person took something that’s dear to us, took our heritage, and turned it into hate.” Templeton and a campaign aide did not respond to requests for comment this weekend. But she acknowledged Charlottesville in a tweet that appeared to reaffirm her support for Confederate nostalgia: “It is the uneducated criminal who uses our history for horrible racist violence. Learn from the past.”
  • State GOP chairmen in Florida and North Carolina. Stewart told BuzzFeed News last week that, following his strong showing in Virginia, he heard from potential candidates seeking his counsel on running pro-Confederate campaigns in both states.

Stewart did not make himself available for another interview this weekend. His spokesperson, Noel Fritsch, did not respond directly to a question about whether neo-Nazis rallying around the Lee statue in Charlottesville might change Stewart’s thinking on the issue.

“Was Tim Kaine marching with the hammer & sickle?” Fritsch replied in an email, referring to the Democratic senator Stewart hopes to unseat next year and to a Communist symbol.

That deflection was consistent with the whataboutism Trump offered in his Saturday remarks — the president condemned “hatred, bigotry, and violence” … “on many sides” — and was on display later that evening in a video statement Stewart made on Facebook.

Stewart took swipes at Kaine and, without offering specific examples, accused Democrats of not condemning or denouncing violence by organizations on the political left, such as Antifa, an anti-fascist group. “If free speech is not protected, people do sometimes turn to violence,” he said. “That is not the right way to go. We must always condemn it. But we must not allow the left to crack down on free speech, to crack down on conservative speech, in the aftermath of what is happening in Charlottesville today.”

A Virginia Republican Party spokesperson sidestepped specific questions Saturday on the appropriateness of pro-Confederate politics and instead pointed to a statement on the party’s website: “The Republican Party was created to end slavery in the mid-1800s and our party today continues to stand for equality for all persons regardless of their race or ethnicity,” Virginia GOP Chairman John Whitbeck said. “We condemn the hatred and racism on display today in Charlottesville and note that there is nothing conservative about messages of that nature.”

Haley’s effort to bring the Confederate flag down in South Carolina propelled her — and the issue — to national prominence. Then-RNC Chairman Reince Priebus stood with her the day she announced the push, signifying how important the issue was to a party that at the time was eager to build bridges with black voters and other minorities.

More recently, though, the decisions have occurred on the local level, with Mayors Mitch Landrieu in New Orleans and Andrew “FoFo” Gilich in Biloxi, Mississippi — a Democrat and Republican, respectively — leading the charge against Confederate symbols. In Richmond, Virginia, once a capital of the confederacy, Democratic Mayor Levar Stoney has called for adding context to old monuments, rather than tearing them down.

Another Democrat, Mayor Jim Gray of Lexington, Kentucky, announced Saturday that he would seek to move two Confederate monuments from the lawn of an old courthouse.

“The tragic events in Charlottesville,” Gray said on Twitter, “have accelerated the announcement I intended to make next week.”

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Manuel Senni wins Colorado Classic

BMC's Manuel Senni wrapped up the overall title at the Colorado Classic on Sunday, finishing safely as the pack sprinted across the stage 4 finish line in Denver with Mihkel Räim (Israel Cycling Academy) nabbing the stage.

Raim's stage win survived a protest from Nippo - Vini Fantini's Marco Canola, who complained after the finish that Raim had deviated to his right in the sprint and boxed the Italian in. The race jury reviewed the video of the finale and upheld Raim's result. UnitedHealthcare's Travis McCabe earned runner-up honours on the day with Alfredo Rodríguez (Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling) taking third and Canola in fourth.

"I've tried many times in Europe and here in the states and been so close. I'm very happy it's finally come," Raim said, before addressing Canola's protest. "I stayed on the straight line, I didn't move from that path. Marco tried to come on the right but there was no space.

"For me, this is for sure the biggest victory in my career, and for the team also. We are very happy. This helps us to have more sponsors and people know our team more. We aren't just a cycling team, we are something else. It's an Israeli team, but we have so many different nationalities in the team and we're like a big family. It doesn't matter where you're from."

For BMC, the order of the day was simply keeping the race under control and keeping Senni upright within the peloton. With the race finishing in a sprint and Senni safe in the pack, it was mission accomplished for the American team and Italian rider, who eked out a top 10 result in the final kick for good measure.

"The team rode for me all day and I was still in the front in the last kilometer to stay out of trouble and take no risk, so I could even do the sprint," Senni said. "I finished tenth, which was enough to keep the jersey. It was perfect.

"It's really great, to win here with so many people on the roads and so friendly, it's something special.

"For me this is an important victory that gives me a lot of morale for the rest of the season and next year. It is important for a rider to win a race, because after it changes something in your mind and gives you the morale."

McCabe wrapped up the sprint classification, having finished on the stage podiums a frustrating three times without netting a victory. "I'm definitely happy winning the sprint jersey. It shows the consistency I have, and I feel like I rode great all week long," McCabe said. "The form was great coming off Utah. But I am disappointed to not come away with a win. Two seconds and a third is great, but when you don't win it's a little bittersweet."

How it unfolded

The final stage of the Colorado Classic in downtown Denver – just 10 laps of an 11-kilometre circuit – was quite a bit more controlled and predictable than the previous two stages. The breakaway went clear on the first lap of the bumpy, technical loop, with Antonio Molina (Caja Rural), Fabio Calabria (Novo Nordisk) and Ruben Companioni (Holowesko-Citadel) being joined by Christopher Blevins (Axeon Hagens Berman).

The quartet came together and quickly gained time as they sped through City Park, ending the first lap with almost a minute. With UnitedHealthcare's Gavin Mannion almost single handedly controlling the gap, the leaders gained 1:45 as their maximum gap on the third lap, at the end of which Blevins took the intermediate sprint bonus.

The gap had come down to 1:30 at the second sprint, as Trek-Segafredo and BMC started contributing to the chase. Campanioni led the breakaway across the line for the second sprint, but even with the time bonus, the Cuban – best placed in the breakaway at 15:59 – was no threat to Senni's overall lead.

With three laps to go, Jelly Belly began to help out, bringing the gap back down to 1:15, and the increased manpower in the peloton continued to help steadily decrease the leader's advantage over the next laps.

Molina took the sprint bonus with two laps to go over Campanioni while in the peloton behind Cannondale-Drapac lost Will Clarke to a crash in a turn, but there was no time to wait as the pursuit of the breakaway was in full flight with 22 kilometres remaining.

When the gap had come down to 40 seconds, Campanioni launched his move, leaving his companions behind with a 21-kilometre individual pursuit ahead of him. Molina waited a moment but then made his own attack to go across to the Holowesko rider, and succeeded before they reached the feed zone, where Campanioni picked up an ice sock to help cool him in the sweltering conditions.

Calabria and Blevins rapidly lost ground and then were picked up by the peloton with 18.2 kilometers to go. Campanioni and Molina pressed on with a 30 second advantage, but they too were swept up as Trek-Segafredo began to ramp up the pace for Reijnen.

By the time Campanioni led across the line for one lap to go, the peloton had the pair in their sights, sweeping them up in short order to set up the final kick.

Trek-Segafredo, Israel Cycling Academy and UnitedHealthcare battled for position coming onto the final straight with UnitedHealthcare the last team with a lead-out man at the front. McCabe was the first of the contenders to launch but Raim came around quickly and surged to the front.

Canola tried to pull past on Raim's right but ran out of room, immediately throwing up his arms in protest. Raim held on for the win.

"I was faster than [Raim] but I was on the right side and I couldn't go on the left. At the start of the sprint I was on the right side but [whoever] was in front did not take the straight line. I had to stop and did the last 80 metres without pedaling," Canola said. "It was frustrating for me because I knew today was a good chance."

The jury deemed Raim's sprint legal, solidifying the result, with Canola settling for fourth.

"The final was really hectic because there were two corners and a long finishing straight," Raim said. "I lost my lead-out guys at some point. It wasn't good to lose them because I can always count on them. I think tactically I made a good choice - I let Travis McCabe's lead out pass me, and I knew Travis was also coming from behind. I just stuck on his wheel and when he launched the sprint I was waiting two or three seconds then started my sprint. That's how Canola started to come on the right a little bit. I closed the door on the right side like every sprinter has to do. It was just pure legs."

Senni rolled home 10th to wrap up the overall title.

Full Results

# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Mihkel Räim (Est) Israel Cycling Academy 2:32:50
2 Travis McCabe (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team
3 Jose Rodriguez (Mex) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling
4 Marco Canola (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 0:00:01
5 Joseph Lewis (Aus) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear
6 Taylor Phinney (USA) Cannondale-Drapac
7 Alex Howes (USA) Cannondale-Drapac
8 Guillaume Boivin (Can) Israel Cycling Academy
9 Kiel Reijnen (USA) Trek-Segafredo
10 Manuel Senni (Ita) BMC Racing Team 0:00:02
11 Miguel Benito (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA
12 Brent Bookwalter (USA) BMC Racing Team
13 Ulises Castillo (Mex) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis
14 Greg Henderson (NZl) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:00:03
15 Justin Oien (USA) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA
16 Jhonatan Navarez (Ecu) Axeon Hagens Berman
17 Umberto Poli (Ita) Team Novo Nordisk
18 Edward Ravasi (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 0:00:04
19 Valerio Conti (Ita) UAE Team Emirates
20 Joey Rosskopf (USA) BMC Racing Team
21 Colin Joyce (USA) Rally Cycling
22 Alan Marangoni (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini
23 Dennis Van Winden (Ned) Israel Cycling Academy 0:00:05
24 Simone Petilli (Ita) UAE Team Emirates
25 TJ Eisenhart (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear
26 Vegard Stake Laengen (Nor) UAE Team Emirates
27 Gonzalo Serrano Rodriguez (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA
28 Matteo Moschetti (Ita) Trek-Segafredo 0:00:06
29 Peter Stetina (USA) Trek-Segafredo
30 Sepp Kuss (USA) Rally Cycling
31 Julien Bernard (Fra) Trek-Segafredo
32 Shane Kline (USA) Rally Cycling
33 Tyler Williams (USA) Israel Cycling Academy
34 Ivan Santaromita (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini
35 Gregory Daniel (USA) Trek-Segafredo 0:00:07
36 Gavin Mannion (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team
37 Andrei Krasilnikau (Blr) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear
38 Ruben Companioni (Cub) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:00:08
39 Serghei Tvetcov (Rom) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis
40 Alex Hoehn (USA) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling
41 Edward Anderson (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:00:10
42 Christopher Butler (USA) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:00:11
43 Nigel Ellsay (Can) Silber Pro Cycling
44 Ryan Roth (Can) Silber Pro Cycling
45 Antonio Molina (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:00:12
46 Hugh Carthy (GBr) Cannondale-Drapac
47 Jonathan Clarke (Aus) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team
48 Jacob Rathe (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:00:14
49 Eder Frayre (Mex) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling
50 Rigoberto Uran (Col) Cannondale-Drapac 0:00:17
51 Manuel Sola Arjona (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:00:18
52 Taylor Shelden (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:00:19
53 Keegan Swirbul (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:00:23
54 Jean Claude Uwizeye (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling
55 Stephen Clancy (Irl) Team Novo Nordisk 0:00:24
56 Martin Elmiger (Swi) BMC Racing Team 0:00:25
57 Jean Paul Rene Ukiniwabo (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 0:00:39
58 Giacomo Berlato (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 0:00:43
59 Daniel Jaramillo (Col) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:00:44
60 Luis Lemus (Mex) Israel Cycling Academy 0:00:52
61 Silvan Dillier (Swi) BMC Racing Team 0:00:53
62 Laurent Didier (Lux) Trek-Segafredo
63 Tom Bohli (Swi) BMC Racing Team
64 Evan Huffman (USA) Rally Cycling 0:00:54
65 Danny Pate (USA) Rally Cycling
66 Yuma Koishi (Jpn) Nippo - Vini Fantini
67 Damiano Cima (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 0:00:55
68 Daniel Eaton (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:01:16
69 John Murphy (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:01:28
70 Miguel Bryon (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:02:00
71 Bonaventure Uwizeyimana (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 0:02:05
72 Seid Lizde (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 0:02:11
73 Fabio Calabria (Aus) Team Novo Nordisk 0:02:24
74 Julien Gagne (Can) Silber Pro Cycling
75 Robert Britton (Can) Rally Cycling 0:02:25
76 Sam Brand (GBr) Team Novo Nordisk 0:02:47
77 Guy Niv (Isr) Israel Cycling Academy
78 Joseph Schmaltz (USA) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling
79 Logan Owen (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:03:57
80 Rik Van Ijzendoorn (Ned) Team Novo Nordisk 0:04:11
81 Gasore Hategeka (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 0:04:12
82 Angus Morton (Aus) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:05:19
83 Alexander Cowan (Can) Silber Pro Cycling
84 Christopher Blevins (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:06:56
85 Didier Munyaneza (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 0:16:26
DNF William Clarke (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac
Points
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Mihkel Räim (Est) Israel Cycling Academy 15 pts
2 Travis McCabe (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 12
3 Jose Rodriguez (Mex) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 10
4 Marco Canola (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 7
5 Joseph Lewis (Aus) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 6
6 Taylor Phinney (USA) Cannondale-Drapac 5
7 Alex Howes (USA) Cannondale-Drapac 4
8 Guillaume Boivin (Can) Israel Cycling Academy 3
9 Kiel Reijnen (USA) Trek-Segafredo 2
10 Manuel Senni (Ita) BMC Racing Team 1
Sprint 1
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Christopher Blevins (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 5 pts
2 Ruben Companioni (Cub) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 3
3 Fabio Calabria (Aus) Team Novo Nordisk 1
Sprint 2
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Ruben Companioni (Cub) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 5 pts
2 Fabio Calabria (Aus) Team Novo Nordisk 3
3 Antonio Molina (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 1
Sprint 3
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Antonio Molina (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 5 pts
2 Ruben Companioni (Cub) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 3
3 Fabio Calabria (Aus) Team Novo Nordisk 1
Regional riders
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Joseph Lewis (Aus) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 2:32:50
2 Taylor Phinney (USA) Cannondale-Drapac
3 Alex Howes (USA) Cannondale-Drapac
4 Greg Henderson (NZl) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team
5 Sepp Kuss (USA) Rally Cycling
6 Gregory Daniel (USA) Trek-Segafredo
7 Gavin Mannion (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team
8 Serghei Tvetcov (Rom) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis
9 Taylor Shelden (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:00:17
10 Keegan Swirbul (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:00:23
11 Danny Pate (USA) Rally Cycling 0:00:52
12 Daniel Eaton (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:01:16
13 Angus Morton (Aus) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:05:19
14 Christopher Blevins (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:06:56
Young riders
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Jose Rodriguez (Mex) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 2:32:50
2 Justin Oien (USA) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA
3 Jhonatan Navarez (Ecu) Axeon Hagens Berman
4 Umberto Poli (Ita) Team Novo Nordisk
5 Matteo Moschetti (Ita) Trek-Segafredo
6 Alex Hoehn (USA) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling
7 Edward Anderson (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:00:10
8 Keegan Swirbul (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:00:23
9 Jean Paul Rene Ukiniwabo (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 0:00:39
10 Miguel Bryon (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:02:00
11 Seid Lizde (Ita) UAE Team Emirates
12 Logan Owen (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:03:57
13 Alexander Cowan (Can) Silber Pro Cycling 0:05:19
14 Christopher Blevins (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:06:56
Teams
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Israel Cycling Academy 7:38:30
2 BMC Racing Team
3 UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team
4 Caja Rural-Seguros RGA
5 Nippo - Vini Fantini
6 UAE Team Emirates
7 Trek-Segafredo
8 Holowesko / Citadel Racing p/b Hincapie Sportswear
9 Rally Cycling
10 Cannondale-Drapac 0:00:10
11 Elevate - KHS Pro Cycling 0:00:14
12 Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis
13 Silber Pro Cycling 0:02:44
14 Team Novo Nordisk 0:02:47
15 Team Rwanda Cycling 0:03:07
16 Axeon Hagens Berman 0:04:07
Final general classification
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Manuel Senni (Ita) BMC Racing Team 12:00:35
2 Serghei Tvetcov (Rom) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:00:15
3 Alex Howes (USA) Cannondale-Drapac 0:00:31
4 TJ Eisenhart (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:00:33
5 Peter Stetina (USA) Trek-Segafredo 0:00:44
6 Sepp Kuss (USA) Rally Cycling 0:01:05
7 Brent Bookwalter (USA) BMC Racing Team 0:02:16
8 Miguel Benito (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:02:19
9 Vegard Stake Laengen (Nor) UAE Team Emirates 0:02:21
10 Travis McCabe (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:02:22
11 Simone Petilli (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 0:02:33
12 Edward Ravasi (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 0:02:47
13 Ivan Santaromita (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 0:03:00
14 Rigoberto Uran (Col) Cannondale-Drapac 0:03:06
15 Hugh Carthy (GBr) Cannondale-Drapac 0:03:07
16 Christopher Butler (USA) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:03:58
17 Jonathan Clarke (Aus) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team
18 Julien Bernard (Fra) Trek-Segafredo 0:05:06
19 Jhonatan Navarez (Ecu) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:08:04
20 Taylor Shelden (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:08:23
21 Kiel Reijnen (USA) Trek-Segafredo 0:09:52
22 Joey Rosskopf (USA) BMC Racing Team 0:15:46
23 Gavin Mannion (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team
24 Ruben Companioni (Cub) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:15:52
25 Nigel Ellsay (Can) Silber Pro Cycling 0:15:58
26 Joseph Lewis (Aus) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:15:59
27 Valerio Conti (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 0:16:21
28 Marco Canola (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 0:17:27
29 Antonio Molina (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:20:14
30 Robert Britton (Can) Rally Cycling 0:20:48
31 Eder Frayre (Mex) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 0:21:13
32 Gonzalo Serrano Rodriguez (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:21:56
33 Justin Oien (USA) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:22:20
34 Taylor Phinney (USA) Cannondale-Drapac 0:22:38
35 Daniel Jaramillo (Col) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:22:39
36 Martin Elmiger (Swi) BMC Racing Team 0:22:43
37 Jacob Rathe (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:23:26
38 Gregory Daniel (USA) Trek-Segafredo 0:24:02
39 Alexander Cowan (Can) Silber Pro Cycling 0:25:29
40 Guillaume Boivin (Can) Israel Cycling Academy 0:26:28
41 Silvan Dillier (Swi) BMC Racing Team 0:27:30
42 Laurent Didier (Lux) Trek-Segafredo 0:27:34
43 Tom Bohli (Swi) BMC Racing Team 0:27:54
44 Luis Lemus (Mex) Israel Cycling Academy 0:28:07
45 Seid Lizde (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 0:28:27
46 Manuel Sola Arjona (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:28:45
47 Jean Claude Uwizeye (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 0:28:50
48 Alex Hoehn (USA) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 0:29:00
49 Andrei Krasilnikau (Blr) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:29:03
50 Dennis Van Winden (Ned) Israel Cycling Academy 0:29:05
51 Jean Paul Rene Ukiniwabo (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 0:29:06
52 Edward Anderson (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:29:15
53 Mihkel Räim (Est) Israel Cycling Academy 0:29:24
54 Colin Joyce (USA) Rally Cycling 0:29:34
55 Keegan Swirbul (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:30:17
56 Yuma Koishi (Jpn) Nippo - Vini Fantini 0:30:26
57 Tyler Williams (USA) Israel Cycling Academy 0:30:41
58 John Murphy (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:31:48
59 Logan Owen (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:32:16
60 Daniel Eaton (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:32:42
61 Umberto Poli (Ita) Team Novo Nordisk 0:33:09
62 Greg Henderson (NZl) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:33:13
63 Miguel Bryon (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:33:59
64 Ulises Castillo (Mex) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:34:16
65 Alan Marangoni (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini
66 Shane Kline (USA) Rally Cycling 0:34:31
67 Danny Pate (USA) Rally Cycling 0:35:08
68 Julien Gagne (Can) Silber Pro Cycling 0:35:29
69 Christopher Blevins (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:35:58
70 Ryan Roth (Can) Silber Pro Cycling 0:36:15
71 Stephen Clancy (Irl) Team Novo Nordisk 0:37:19
72 Evan Huffman (USA) Rally Cycling 0:37:27
73 Gasore Hategeka (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 0:40:06
74 Matteo Moschetti (Ita) Trek-Segafredo 0:40:17
75 Angus Morton (Aus) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:41:00
76 Joseph Schmaltz (USA) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 0:42:06
77 Sam Brand (GBr) Team Novo Nordisk 0:42:20
78 Giacomo Berlato (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 0:42:31
79 Guy Niv (Isr) Israel Cycling Academy 0:42:44
80 Damiano Cima (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 0:43:14
81 Jose Rodriguez (Mex) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 0:44:25
82 Rik Van Ijzendoorn (Ned) Team Novo Nordisk 0:45:49
83 Fabio Calabria (Aus) Team Novo Nordisk 0:49:47
84 Bonaventure Uwizeyimana (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 1:00:35
Points classification
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Travis McCabe (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 43 pts
2 Alex Howes (USA) Cannondale-Drapac 28
3 Manuel Senni (Ita) BMC Racing Team 25
4 Serghei Tvetcov (Rom) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 24
5 TJ Eisenhart (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 20
6 Mihkel Räim (Est) Israel Cycling Academy 15
7 Kiel Reijnen (USA) Trek-Segafredo 15
8 Marco Canola (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 14
9 Ruben Companioni (Cub) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 11
10 Brent Bookwalter (USA) BMC Racing Team 11
11 Peter Stetina (USA) Trek-Segafredo 10
12 Jose Rodriguez (Mex) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 10
13 Antonio Molina (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 9
14 Miguel Benito (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 6
15 Joseph Lewis (Aus) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 6
16 Daniel Eaton (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 5
17 Christopher Blevins (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 5
18 Taylor Phinney (USA) Cannondale-Drapac 5
19 Fabio Calabria (Aus) Team Novo Nordisk 5
20 Jhonatan Navarez (Ecu) Axeon Hagens Berman 4
21 Rigoberto Uran (Col) Cannondale-Drapac 3
22 Valerio Conti (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 3
23 Guillaume Boivin (Can) Israel Cycling Academy 3
24 Joseph Schmaltz (USA) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 3
25 Vegard Stake Laengen (Nor) UAE Team Emirates 2
26 John Murphy (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 1
27 Hugh Carthy (GBr) Cannondale-Drapac 1
Mountains classification
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Serghei Tvetcov (Rom) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 19 pts
2 TJ Eisenhart (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 14
3 Peter Stetina (USA) Trek-Segafredo 9
4 Marco Canola (Ita) Nippo - Vini Fantini 8
5 Antonio Molina (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 8
6 Manuel Senni (Ita) BMC Racing Team 8
7 Jonathan Clarke (Aus) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 5
8 Daniel Eaton (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 5
9 Angus Morton (Aus) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 5
10 Joseph Schmaltz (USA) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 5
11 Kiel Reijnen (USA) Trek-Segafredo 3
12 Valerio Conti (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 3
13 Evan Huffman (USA) Rally Cycling 2
14 Sepp Kuss (USA) Rally Cycling 1
15 Simone Petilli (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 1
16 Julien Bernard (Fra) Trek-Segafredo 1
Regional riders classification
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Serghei Tvetcov (Rom) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 12:00:50
2 Alex Howes (USA) Cannondale-Drapac 0:00:16
3 Sepp Kuss (USA) Rally Cycling 0:00:50
4 Taylor Shelden (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:08:08
5 Gavin Mannion (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:15:31
6 Joseph Lewis (Aus) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:15:44
7 Taylor Phinney (USA) Cannondale-Drapac 0:22:23
8 Gregory Daniel (USA) Trek-Segafredo 0:23:47
9 Keegan Swirbul (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:30:02
10 Daniel Eaton (USA) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:32:27
11 Greg Henderson (NZl) UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:32:58
12 Danny Pate (USA) Rally Cycling 0:34:53
13 Christopher Blevins (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:35:43
14 Angus Morton (Aus) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:40:45
Young riders classification
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Jhonatan Navarez (Ecu) Axeon Hagens Berman 12:08:39
2 Justin Oien (USA) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:14:16
3 Alexander Cowan (Can) Silber Pro Cycling 0:17:25
4 Seid Lizde (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 0:20:23
5 Alex Hoehn (USA) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 0:20:56
6 Jean Paul Rene Ukiniwabo (Rwa) Team Rwanda Cycling 0:21:02
7 Edward Anderson (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:21:11
8 Keegan Swirbul (USA) Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:22:13
9 Logan Owen (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:24:12
10 Umberto Poli (Ita) Team Novo Nordisk 0:25:05
11 Miguel Bryon (USA) Holowesko-Citadel p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:25:55
12 Christopher Blevins (USA) Axeon Hagens Berman 0:27:54
13 Matteo Moschetti (Ita) Trek-Segafredo 0:32:13
14 Jose Rodriguez (Mex) Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling 0:36:21
Teams classification
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Cannondale-Drapac 36:08:03
2 UAE Team Emirates 0:01:21
3 Trek-Segafredo 0:09:25
4 BMC Racing Team 0:11:53
5 UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team 0:16:00
6 Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:19:59
7 Jelly Belly p/b Maxxis 0:25:04
8 Holowesko / Citadel Racing p/b Hincapie Sportswear 0:26:24
9 Rally Cycling 0:42:45
10 Nippo - Vini Fantini 0:43:43
11 Silber Pro Cycling 1:01:11
12 Israel Cycling Academy 1:03:10
13 Axeon Hagens Berman 1:03:23
14 Elevate - KHS Pro Cycling 1:13:33
15 Team Rwanda Cycling 1:15:30
16 Team Novo Nordisk 1:46:07

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Tom Dumoulin up to second on WorldTour rankings

Tom Dumoulin's overall win at BinckBank Tour has lifted the Dutchman into second place on the WorldTour rankings. The was Dumoulin's second general classification of his career after the Giro d'Italia in May.

Photo: Dumoulin takes overall victory at BinckBank Tour

Olympic champion Greg Van Avermaet (BMC) is still leading the rankings, having gone top following his E3 Harelbeke victory, while QuickStep-Floors continue to lead the team rankings. The Belgian squad has led the rankings since Dwars door Vlaanderen.

With nine WorldTour events to race in 2017, Dumoulin has closed in on Van Avermaet's 2956 points with the Sunweb riding moving to 2515 points. In third place is Sky's Michał Kwiatkowski on 2171 points with Alejandro Valverde fourth on 2105 points. Dan Martin (QuickStep-Floors) is the only other to have scored more than 200 points with 2040 to his name.

402 riders have now scored WorldTour points.

In the team standings, QuickStep-Floors holds a commanding lead over the other 17 teams. The Belgian squad has amassed 10428 points with BMC Racing a distant second on 9353 points. At the other end of the rankings, Dimension Data is last on 2073 points with FDJ second from last on 2923 points.

With the winner of the Vuelta a Espana (19 August-10 September) to be awarded 850 points, the WorldTour rankings will undergo a shake up. Tour de France winner Chris Froome (Team Sky) has scored 1824 points thus far in 2017 and is aiming for the overall win in Spain.

The 2017 WorldTour concludes in October with the inaugural edition of the Tour of Guangxi in China.

WorldTour rankings - August 14

Individual
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Greg Van Avermaet (Bel) BMC Racing Team 2956 pts
2 Tom Dumoulin (Ned) Team Sunweb 2515
3 Michal Kwiatkowski (Pol) Team Sky 2171
4 Alejandro Valverde (Esp) Movistar Team 2105
5 Dan Martin (Irl) Quick-Step Floors 2040
6 Peter Sagan (Svk) Bora–Hansgrohe 1944
7 Richie Porte (Aus) BMC Racing Team 1882
8 Philippe Gilbert (Bel) Quick-Step Floors 1865
9 Chris Froome (GBr) Team Sky 1824
10 Nairo Quintana (Col) Movistar Team 1711
11 Alberto Contador (Esp) Trek–Segafredo 1463
12 Michael Matthews (Aus) Team Sunweb 1419
13 Romain Bardet (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 1396
14 Rigoberto Urán (Col) Cannondale–Drapac 1310
15 Ion Izagirre (Esp) Bahrain–Merida 1276
16 Alexander Kristoff (Nor) Team Katusha–Alpecin 1266
17 Sergio Henao (Col) Team Sky 1206
18 Primož Roglic (Slo) LottoNL–Jumbo 1181
19 Mikel Landa (Esp) Team Sky 1150
20 Domenico Pozzovivo (Ita) AG2R La Mondiale 1100
21 Thibaut Pinot (Fra) FDJ 1092
22 Simon Yates (GBr) Orica–Scott 1050
23 Ilnur Zakarin (Rus) Team Katusha–Alpecin 1035
24 Bauke Mollema (Ned) Trek–Segafredo 992
25 John Degenkolb (Ger) Trek–Segafredo 990
Teams
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Quick-Step Floors 10428 pts
2 BMC Racing Team 9353
3 Team Sky 9139
4 Orica–Scott 6621
5 Team Sunweb 6567
6 Movistar Team 6398
7 Trek–Segafredo 6181
8 Bora–Hansgrohe 5263
9 AG2R La Mondiale 4827
10 Cannondale–Drapac 4477
11 Team Katusha–Alpecin 4272
12 LottoNL–Jumbo 4075
13 Lotto–Soudal 3617
14 UAE Team Emirates 3575
15 Astana 3483
16 Bahrain–Merida 3238
17 FDJ 2923
18 Team Dimension Data 2073

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‘Annabelle’ scares up $35M, jolting sleepy box office

Lulu Wilson in ‘Annabelle: Creation.’ (Warner Brothers Pictures via AP)

The opening came close to matching the film’s predecessor, “Annabelle,” which opened with $37.1 million in October 2014. Warner Bros. could celebrate not only the month’s biggest debut but also having the week’s top two films. Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” followed in second with $11.4 million in its fourth weekend, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Even amid an especially weak August, the well-reviewed horror sequel and modestly budgeted “Annabelle: Creation” found eager audiences.
“That we were able to do $35 million in what is a very sluggish marketplace was very impressive,” said Jeffrey Goldstein, Warner Bros.’ distribution chief. “We all know that moviegoing begets moviegoing and right now it’s a dip in the content overall.”

The film, the third to spiral out of 2013’s “The Conjuring,” cost only about $15 million to make. More sequels and spinoffs are being developed in what has become for Warner Bros. a steadily profitable horror franchise bent on old-school frights. The “Annabelle” offshoot centers on a possessed doll.

Last week’s top film, the poorly received Stephen King adaptation “The Dark Tower,” slid dramatically. The Sony Pictures release, starring Idris Elba and Matthew McConaughey, toppled nearly 60 percent on its second weekend with an estimated $7.9 million.

The week’s other new entry, the Open Road animated release “Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature,” edged just above “The Dark Tower” with $8.9 million. That was well below the 2014 debut of the original, “The Nut Job,” which opened with $19.4 million.

But the solid returns for “Annabelle: Creation” did little to counter the box-office slide. The box office was down 31.6 percent from the same weekend last year, when “Suicide Squad” was No. 1 despite brutal reviews and Seth Rogen’s “Sausage Party” opened. The summer altogether is down 12.4 percent from last year, according to comScore.

“This is a great weekend to be a really scary doll and Warner Bros., but for everyone else, it’s just plain scary,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “It proves the horror genre is alive and well.”

Some of July’s bright spots, however, have continued into August. The summer’s top comedy, “Girls Trip,” will soon surpass $100 million domestically. The movie, starring Jada Pinkett Smith and Queen Latifah, took in $6.5 million in its fourth week to bring its cumulative total to $97.2 million. It may end up doubling the gross of its closest summer comedy competition: the starrier and pricey “Baywatch” ($58.1 million in its entire run).

In limited release, the A24 crime thriller “Good Time,” starring Robert Pattinson, debuted with a robust $34,000 per-screen average on four screens. That was bettered, though, by the $47,000 screen-average of Neon’s “Ingrid Goes West,” with Aubrey Plaza, on three screens. Both films expand in coming weeks.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters according to comScore. Where available, the latest international numbers also are included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1. “Annabelle: Creation,” $35 million ($35 million international).
2. “Dunkirk,” $11.4 million ($14.5 million international).
3. “Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature,” $8.9 million.
4. “The Dark Tower,” $7.9 million ($7.9 million international).
5. “The Emoji Movie,” $6.6 million ($14.1 million international).
6. “Girls Trip,” $6.5 million ($1.4 million international).
7. “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” $6.1 million ($12.4 million international).
8. “Kidnap,” $5.2 million.
9. “Glass Castle,” $4.9 million.
10. “Atomic Blonde,” $4.6 million ($5.2 million international).

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BEYOND EMBARGO | N. Korea factories humming with ‘Made in China’ clothes, traders say

North Korean workers make soccer shoes inside a temporary factory at a rural village on the edge of Dandong, Liaoning province, China, October 24, 2012.


DANDONG, China – Chinese textile firms are increasingly using North Korean factories to take advantage of cheaper labor across the border, traders and businesses in the border city of Dandong told Reuters.

The clothes made in North Korea are labeled “Made in China” and exported across the world, they said.

Using North Korea to produce cheap clothes for sale around the globe shows that for every door that is closed by ever-tightening UN sanctions another one may open. The UN sanctions, introduced to punish North Korea for its missile and nuclear programs, do not include any bans on textile exports.

“We take orders from all over the world,” said one Korean-Chinese businessman in Dandong, the Chinese border city where the majority of North Korea trade passes through. Like many people Reuters interviewed for this story, he spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue.

Dozens of clothing agents operate in Dandong, acting as go-betweens for Chinese clothing suppliers and buyers from the United States, Europe, Japan, South Korea, Canada and Russia, the businessman said.

“We will ask the Chinese suppliers who work with us if they plan on being open with their client — sometimes the final buyer won’t realize their clothes are being made in North Korea. It’s extremely sensitive,” he said.

Textiles were North Korea’s second-biggest export after coal and other minerals in 2016, totaling $752 million, according to data from the Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA). Total exports from North Korea in 2016 rose 4.6 percent to $2.82 billion.

The latest UN sanctions, agreed earlier this month, have completely banned coal exports now.

Its flourishing textiles industry shows how impoverished North Korea has adapted, with a limited embrace of market reforms, to sanctions since 2006 when it first tested a nuclear device. The industry also shows the extent to which North Korea relies on China as an economic lifeline, even as US President Donald Trump piles pressure on Beijing to do more to rein in its neighbor’s weapons programs.

Chinese exports to North Korea rose almost 30 percent to $1.67 billion in the first half of the year, largely driven by textile materials and other traditional labor-intensive goods not included on the United Nations embargo list, Chinese customs spokesman Huang Songping told reporters.

Chinese suppliers send fabrics and other raw materials required for manufacturing clothing to North Korean factories across the border where garments are assembled and exported.

Factories humming

Australian sportswear brand Rip Curl publicly apologized last year when it was discovered that some of its ski gear, labeled “Made in China”, had been made in one of North Korea’s garment factories. Rip Curl blamed a rogue supplier for outsourcing to “an unauthorized subcontractor”.

But traders and agents in Dandong say it’s a widespread practice.

Manufacturers can save up to 75 percent by making their clothes in North Korea, said a Chinese trader who has lived in Pyongyang.

Some of the North Korean factories are located in Siniuju city just across the border from Dandong. Other factories are located outside Pyongyang. Finished clothing is often directly shipped from North Korea to Chinese ports before being sent onto the rest of the world, the Chinese traders and businesses said.

North Korea has about 15 large garment exporting enterprises, each operating several factories spread around the country, and dozens of medium sized companies, according to GPI Consultancy of the Netherlands, which helps foreign companies do business in North Korea.

All factories in North Korea are state-owned. And the textile ones appear to be humming, traders and agents say. “We’ve been trying to get some of our clothes made in North Korea but the factories are fully booked at the moment,” said a Korean-Chinese businesswoman at a factory in Dalian, a Chinese port city two hours away from Dandong by train.

“North Korean workers can produce 30 percent more clothes each day than a Chinese worker,” said the Korean-Chinese businessman.

“In North Korea, factory workers can’t just go to the toilet whenever they feel like, otherwise they think it slows down the whole assembly line.”

“They aren’t like Chinese factory workers who just work for the money. North Koreans have a different attitude — they believe they are working for their country, for their leader.”

And they are paid wages significantly below many other Asian countries. North Korean workers at the now shuttered Kaesong industrial zone just across the border from South Korea received wages ranging from a minimum of around $75 a month to an average of around $160, compared to average factory wages of $450-$750 a month in China. Kaesong was run jointly with South Korea and the wage structure – much higher than in the rest of North Korea – was negotiated with Seoul.

Workers in China

Chinese clothing manufacturers have been increasingly using North Korean textile factories even as they relocate their own factories offshore, including to Bangladesh, Vietnam and Cambodia.

“Wages are too high in China now. It’s no wonder so many orders are being sent to North Korea,” said a Korean-Chinese businesswoman who works in the textiles industry in Dandong.

Chinese textile companies are also employing thousands of cheaper North Korean workers in China.

North Korea relies on overseas workers to earn hard currency, especially since UN sanctions have choked off some other sources of export earnings. Much of their wages are remitted back to the state and help fund Pyongyang’s ambitious nuclear and missile programs, the UN says.

The new UN sanctions imposed on North Korea this month ban countries from increasing the current numbers of North Korean laborers working abroad.

China does not disclose official figures for the number of North Koreans working in factories and restaurants in China, although numbers are down from a peak period two to three years ago, according to Cheng Xiaohe, a North Korea specialist at Beijing’s Renmin University.

“It’s a hassle to hire North Korean workers though,” the Korean-Chinese businesswoman from Dalian said. “You need to have the right set-up. Their living space has to be completely closed off, you have to provide a classroom where they can take classes every day. They bring their own doctor, nurse, cook and teachers who teach them North Korean ideology every day.”

One clothing factory that Reuters visited in Dandong employs 40 North Korean workers. They fill smaller orders for clients who are more stringent about their supply chains and expressly request no production inside North Korea.

North Korean factory workers in China earn about 2,000 yuan ($300.25), about half of the average for Chinese workers, the factory owner said.

They are allowed to keep around a third of their wages, with the rest going to their North Korean government handlers, he said. A typical shift at the factory runs from 7:30 a.m. to around 10 p.m.

The workers – all women dressed in pink and black uniforms – sat close together behind four rows of sewing machines, working on a consignment of dark-colored winter jackets. The Chinese characters for “clean” and “tidy” were emblazoned in bold blue lettering above their heads and the main factory floor was silent but for the tapping and whirring of sewing machines.

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Fans pay big money for Mayweather-McGregor tickets

Reuters photo


Fight fans attending the much-hyped boxing match between Floyd Mayweather and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor will have a chance to rub shoulders with the stars in Las Vegas — but it won’t come cheap.

The least expensive ticket listed on reseller StubHub is going for an eye-watering $1675 with two weeks to go until the Aug. 26 fight which pits undefeated boxer Mayweather against the UFC’s lightweight champion in a 12-round super welterweight matchup.

“Usually for these large events it’s comparable to a Super Bowl. There’s going to be a lot of stars at these events, especially in the high-priced ticket range, the ringside seats,” StubHub spokesman Cameron Papp said.

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime, bucket-list event, so the die-hard Mayweather and McGregor fans are usually going to find their way to the event.”

The fight has not yet sold out, with high face values and a lack of access seeming to have slowed down demand.

Yet Leonard Ellebre, CEO of Mayweather Promotions, dismissed concerns about the fight’s popularity earlier in the week.

“This isn’t a damn Rolling Stones concert. They’re the only thing that sells out in seconds,” he told reporters at Mayweather’s media workout in Las Vegas on Thursday.

“Right now we have over $60 million in ticket sales – what part of that remotely looks like ticket sales are slow?

“We’re talking about tickets that go form $500 to $10,000. That’s an expensive ticket.”

The $60 million figure revealed by Ellebre dwarfs the UFC box office record of $17 million set at Madison Square Garden in November 2016 when McGregor defeated Eddie Alvarez to win the lightweight title.

That, however, is still a long way short of Mayweather’s previous record of $72 million in ticket sales, a figure achieved when he met Manny Pacquiao at the MGM Garden Arena in Las Vegas in 2015.

“Boxing is still number one, but we’ve seen more growth in MMA over the last two years, they’ve really built up their brand and we’re seeing the demand for it,” Papp said.

One reason for this growth is the enormous popularity of McGregor, and it was fan interest in the fight between the brash 29-year-old and the unbeaten Mayweather that led to it being arranged.

One seller on the Vivid Seats website has listed a pair of ringside seats for the contest at a staggering $164,043 each, but Papp says that prices in secondary markets are likely to come down closer to the event.

“You’re going to set your price pretty high early as a seller to see what you can get, but once you get closer to the event, sellers are looking to unload those tickets,” Papp explained.

With fans hard-pressed to afford tickets, other venues in Las Vegas are jumping on the bandwagon, with the RiRa Irish pub, a popular bar among McGregor supporters, selling tickets for $150 just to watch the pay-per-view broadcast on TV.

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Neo-Nazis blamed for violence in Virginia; one dead as car plows through crowd

Photo of James Alex Fields, a man from Ohio held by Virginia police as a suspect in the fatal drive-through of a silver sedan into counter-protesters opposing a rally of white nationalists. One person died, and five are in critical condition from the car attack. REUTERS


CHARLOTTESVILLE, Virginia – A gathering of hundreds of white nationalists in Virginia took a deadly turn on Saturday when a car plowed into a group of counter-protesters and killed at least one person in a flare up of violence that challenged US President Donald Trump.

The state’s governor blamed neo-Nazis for sparking the unrest in the college town of Charlottesville, where rival groups fought pitched battles using rocks and pepper spray after far-right protesters converged to demonstrate against a plan to remove a statue to a Confederate war hero.

A car slammed into a crowd of people, killing a 32-year-old woman, police said. Video on social media and Reuters photographs showed the car hit a large group of counter-protesters, sending some flying into the air.

Federal authorities opened a civil rights investigation into the death.

Two Virginia policeman died in a helicopter crash nearby after assisting efforts to quell the clashes.

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe, a Democrat, declared an emergency and halted a white nationalist rally, while President Donald Trump condemned the violence.

“I have a message to all the white supremacists and the Nazis who came into Charlottesville today. Our message is plain and simple: go home,” McAuliffe told a news conference. “You are not wanted in this great commonwealth. Shame on you.”

As midnight approached, the streets of Charlottesville had gone quiet.

White supremacists resurface

The clashes highlight how the white supremacist movement has resurfaced under the “alt-right” banner after years in the shadows of mainstream American politics.

Trump said “many sides” were involved, drawing fire from across the political spectrum for not specifically denouncing the far right. The violence presented Trump with perhaps the first domestic crisis of his young administration.

“We’re closely following the terrible events unfolding in Charlottesville, Virginia,” Trump told reporters at his New Jersey golf course.

We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.”
Trump made no reply to a reporter’s shouted question whether he had spoken out strongly enough against white nationalists.

Man from Ohio held

Police held a man from Ohio on charges relating to the car incident, including second-degree murder, said Martin Kumer, Albemarle Charlottesville’s regional jail superintendent.

The suspect was James Alex Fields, Jr., a 20-year-old white man from Ohio, Kumer said. It was not clear why he was in Charlottesville, home to the University of Virginia’s flagship campus.

After hours of clashes, a silver sedan driving at high speed plowed into the crowd before reversing along the same street. The incident took place about two blocks from the park displaying the statue of Robert E. Lee, who headed the Confederate army in the American Civil War.

Five people suffered critical injuries and four had serious injuries from the car strike, officials said.

A civil rights investigation has been opened into the crash death, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Virginia and the FBI’s Richmond field office said late on Saturday.

“The FBI will collect all available facts and evidence,” they said in a joint statement.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions also condemned the violence in Charlottesville, vowing “the full support of the Department of Justice” for the US Attorney’s office in a statement.

Three more men were arrested, Virginia State Police said late on Saturday night. Two 21-year-olds from Tennessee and Virginia were charged, one with disorderly conduct and the other with assault and battery, while a 44-year-old Florida man was arrested for carrying a concealed weapon.

‘Domestic terrorism?’

Prominent Democrats, civil rights activists and some Republicans said it was inexcusable of the president not to denounce white supremacy.

“Mr. President – we must call evil by its name,” Republican US Senator Cory Gardner wrote on social network Twitter.
“These were white supremacists and this was domestic,” said Gardner, chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, the group charged with helping to get Republicans elected to the Senate.

Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic leader in the US House of Representatives, said in a tweet directed at the president: “Repeat after me, @realDonaldTrump: white supremacy is an affront to American values.”

Fighting broke out on Saturday in the city’s downtown, when hundreds of people, some wearing white nationalist symbols and carrying Confederate battle flags, were confronted by a nearly equal number of counter-protesters.

The Charlottesville City Council voted unanimously to allow the police chief to declare a curfew. No action on the move has been taken as midnight approached, Mayor Mike Signer said on his Facebook page.

The confrontation was a stark reminder of the growing political polarization since Trump’s election last year.
“You will not erase us,” chanted a crowd of white nationalists, while counter-protesters carried placards that read: “Nazi go home” and “Smash white supremacy.”

Scott Stroney, 50, a catering sales director at the University of Virginia who arrived at the scene of the car incident just after the crash, said he was horrified.

“I started to cry. I couldn’t talk for a while,” he said. “It was just hard to watch, hard to see. It’s heartbreaking.”

The violence began on Friday night, when hundreds of white marchers with blazing torches appeared at the campus in a display that critics called reminiscent of a Ku Klux Klan rally.

David Duke, a former leader of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan, was in Charlottesville for the rally, according to his Twitter account.

The rally was part of a long debate in the US South over the Confederate battle flag and other symbols of the rebel side in the Civil War, which was fought over the issue of slavery.

The violence is the latest clash between far-rightists, some of whom have claimed allegiance to Trump, and the president’s opponents since his January inauguration, when black-clad anti-Trump protesters in Washington smashed windows, torched cars and clashed with police, leading to more than 200 arrests.

About two dozen people were arrested in Charlottesville in July when the Ku Klux Klan rallied against the plan to remove the Lee statue. Torch-wielding white nationalists also demonstrated against the decision in May.

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‘Easy, easy!’ PH tells parties in Korean threat trade; contingency set for Pinoys in Guam, Sokor

The Department of Foreign Affairs building in Manila, in Phil. Star file photo.
MANILA – The Philippines has reiterated its call for restraint in the Korean Peninsula, even as it stepped up contingency for tens of thousands of Filipinos based in South Korea and in Guam, the US territory that North Korea has threatened to attack.

“The Philippine Embassy in Seoul and the Consulate General in Agana have been monitoring the situation closely and have been working closely with the Filipino communities in the Republic of Korea and Guam, respectively, to ensure preparedness for any eventuality,” Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said in a statement.

Also on Sunday, the Department of Foreign Affairs assured the public that contingency measures are in place in case the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) make good its threat to fire missiles towards Guam.

In a statement Sunday, DFA said Foreign Affairs Secretary Alan Peter S. Cayetano was on the phone with Ambassador Raul Hernandez in Seoul and Consul General Marciano de Borja in Agana for updates on the situation in their respective areas of jurisdiction.

The Department said both Ambassador Hernandez and Consul General De Borja have given assurances that their respective contingency plans for the Filipino community are in place should the tensions in the Korean Peninsula escalate further.

Cayetano echoed President Rodrigo Duterte’s calls for both the United States and the DPRK to exercise restraint and to take the necessary steps to avoid further escalation of the situation.

DFA cited estimates of approximately 65,000 Filipinos in South Korea and another 42,835 in Guam.

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Duterte gov’t’s use of drug boxes, drug-free stickers might lead to mistaken arrests, discrimination – CHR

File photo of President Rodrigo Duterte


MANILA, Philippines – The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) has expressed concern over the government’s use of drug boxes and drug-free stickers as part of the Duterte administration’s anti-narcotics campaign.

In a statement issued Sunday, the CHR said that while it “supports the government’s campaign,” these measures might lead to mistaken arrests and discrimination of persons suspected of being involved in illegal drugs.

“The Commission fears that the manner of pursuing personalities involved in illegal drugs violates the Bill of Rights of the Philippine Constitution, infringing on their human rights guaranteed under local law and applicable international law,” it said.

The CHR said the “information collected through the drop boxes — while serves as tips or leads to the police — may expose an individual to mistaken arrest if the information is not verified and court processes are not involved.”

“In the same way, residents of a house with no drug-free sticker may be unduly discriminated and/or tagged as drug-users/pushers without due process of law guaranteed by the Constitution,” the commission said.

“This also violates the right of any person to be heard before he/she is condemned. A person’s honor, as well as the reputation of his/her family, would also be harmed,” it added.

The CHR said local and national authorities must be reminded that they should “respect and protect human dignity and maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons” as stated in Section 2 of the UN Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials.

It also said that the country’s 1987 Charter and international covenants uphold “the individual’s right to privacy, human dignity, and equal treatment before the law without discrimination.”

“We recognize the vitality of any community-based program, which aims to highlight that peace and order is a shared responsibility of every Filipino, and that concerned citizens and sectors can proactively help the government in its campaign against crime and illegal drugs. But the CHR remains firm that authorities must ensure that these measures are not, in any way, violative of the Constitution and other human rights standards,” the commission said.

“The Commission continues to be watchful of the measures and procedures that are implemented. The Commission is also hopeful that the government will continue to re-examine its anti-drug campaign and adopt a strategic and comprehensive, but human rights-based approach,” it added.

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White House Acts to Stem Fallout From Trump’s First Charlottesville Remarks

White nationalists in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday before violence erupted. President Trump has been criticized for his response to the events. Credit Edu Bayer for The New York Times


BRIDGEWATER, N.J. — White House officials, under siege over President Trump’s reluctance to condemn white supremacists for the weekend’s bloody rallies in Charlottesville, Va., tried to clarify his comments on Sunday, as critics in both parties intensified demands that he adopt a stronger, more unifying message.

A statement on Sunday — issued more than 36 hours after the protests began — condemned “white supremacists” for the violence that led to one death. It came in an email sent to reporters in the president’s traveling press pool, and was attributed to an unnamed representative.

It was not attributed directly to Mr. Trump, who often uses Twitter to communicate directly on controversial topics. It also did not single out “white supremacists” alone but instead included criticism of “all extremist groups.”

The email was sent “in response” to questions about Mr. Trump’s remarks, in which he blamed the unrest “on many sides” while speaking on Saturday before an event for military veterans at his golf resort in Bedminster, N.J., where the president is on vacation.

“The president said very strongly in his statement yesterday that he condemns all forms of violence, bigotry and hatred,” the statement said. “Of course that includes white supremacists, K.K.K. neo-Nazi and all extremist groups. He called for national unity and bringing all Americans together.”

Mr. Trump’s high-volume outbursts on issues petty and profound have become a defining feature of his presidency. But his quiescence on the violence in Charlottesville has had, in many ways, a more profound and unsettling effect.

The president’s reluctance to speak out with force and moral indignation against the white nationalists who incited the most serious racial episode of his presidency elicited deep feelings of disappointment spanning the ideological spectrum, and a spreading sense that he had squandered a critical opportunity to empathize, unite and move beyond the acrimony that has engulfed the White House and country.

“I think what you saw here was a real moment in our nation for our leaders to deal with this moral issue as one country, as people all over the world watched,” Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia said, speaking on a cellphone outside the home of one of the two state troopers killed in a helicopter crash monitoring the melee on Saturday.

Mr. Trump’s “words were not — not — what this nation needs,” Mr. McAuliffe, a Democrat, said, his voice breaking with emotion. “He needs to call out the white supremacists, he needs to call out the neo-Nazis to say these people should not be in our country. I do think it’s the president’s responsibility to take leadership on this. It’s what any American would do. Now is the time to step up.”

Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, a Republican and a frequent critic of Mr. Trump, cautioned against reading too much into the president’s initial response but called for the White House to use the episode as an opportunity to convene “a national discussion” on race, prejudice and community policing.

“There are a lot of people who are just not comfortable with the issue; perhaps they are afraid it would aggravate their base,” Mr. Kasich said, adding, “I think a president can always provide some leadership on a subject like this.”

The criticism of Mr. Trump intensified on Sunday, with lawmakers from both parties calling on him to explicitly condemn the role of white racists and agitators affiliated with the fringe movement known as the alt-right, some of whom brandished pro-Trump banners and campaign placards during violent protests over the removal of a Robert E. Lee statue from a Charlottesville park.

Mr. Trump will continue to receive regular updates from his team, according to the official to whom the statement was attributed, and Thomas P. Bossert, the White House Homeland Security adviser, was in Bedminster monitoring the situation.

As the White House shifted its message, the Justice Department opened a hate crimes inquiry into the violence, which included the death of a 32-year-old woman.

James Alex Fields Jr. of Ohio was charged with second-degree murder, accused of running down her and others in a car. Nineteen other people were injured in the episode, which Mr. McAuliffe called “murder, plain and simple.”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions was pressed during his confirmation hearings early this year about how he might handle such a case, and many on Sunday said they saw the Charlottesville investigation as a test for him.

In a statement late Saturday, Mr. Sessions went further than the president had in his remarks, condemning not just the violence and deaths in Charlottesville but adding that “when such actions arise from racial bigotry and hatred, they betray our core values and cannot be tolerated.”

It was unclear on Sunday what the specific scope of the investigation was. A spokesman for the department declined to comment beyond a statement released late Saturday that had cited the cooperation of the F.B.I. field office in Richmond, Va.; the United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Virginia; and the Justice Department’s civil rights division.

“It’s a test for Attorney General Sessions in that he has put such a premium on cracking down on violence in cities and violent offenders, and obviously during his confirmation there were issues raised about equal justice under law,” said John P. Fishwick, a former United States attorney for the Western District of Virginia during the Obama administration.

Administration officials largely appeared to avoid branding the car rampage as domestic terrorism, but some experts said it certainly could meet the legal standard.

“You can be a domestic terrorist if you’re trying to intimidate the population, or if you’re trying to affect the conduct of the government by mass destruction,” Mr. Fishwick said. “Nineteen people wounded — a number of them critically — and one dead. I think that’s enough.”

Mr. Trump consulted a broad range of advisers before speaking on Saturday, most of whom told him to sharply criticize the white nationalist protesters.

At the center of the discussion was Mr. Bossert, who laid out the situation on the ground, including a description of provocations by both protesters and counterprotesters, according to a White House official.

Two hard-edge economic populists — Stephen K. Bannon, the president’s chief strategist, and Stephen Miller, a senior adviser — spoke with Mr. Trump repeatedly on Saturday, the person said, although it was not clear if Mr. Bannon had offered him advice on his comments.

Mr. Trump listened attentively, according to another person familiar with the discussions, but repeatedly steered the conversation to the breakdown of “law and order,” and the responsibility of local officials to stem the violence.

Mr. Bossert, in an interview Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union,” dismissed any suggestion that the president had failed to adequately condemn white supremacists.

Mr. Bossert praised the statement the president made on Saturday — which denounced the “egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides” — saying that Mr. Trump had appropriately criticized an event that “turned into an unacceptable level of violence at all levels.”

“This isn’t about President Trump — this is about a level of violence and hatred that could not be tolerated in this country,” Mr. Bossert told CNN’s Jake Tapper. “I was with the president yesterday, and I’m proud of the fact that he stood up and calmly looked into the camera and condemned this violence and bigotry in all its forms. This racial intolerance and racial bigotry cannot be condoned.”

Mr. Tapper responded by citing a white nationalist website that described Mr. Trump’s remarks as “really, really good.”

He then asked Mr. Bossert, “Are you at least willing to concede that the president was not clear enough in condemning white supremacy?”

Mr. Bossert replied that Mr. Trump “didn’t dignify the names of these groups of people, but rather addressed the fundamental issue.”

As the gravity of the events on Saturday became clearer, the pressure on Mr. Trump to make a stronger statement came from his innermost circle of advisers and family.

“With the moral authority of the presidency, you have to call that stuff out,” Anthony Scaramucci, an ally of Mr. Trump’s who served briefly as White House communications director last month, told George Stephanopoulos of ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday.

“I wouldn’t have recommended that statement,” added Mr. Scaramucci, whose abbreviated tenure was characterized by a pledge to let Mr. Trump express himself without interference from staff members. “I think he would have needed to have been much harsher.”

Still, the tone and tenor of the president’s comments on Saturday — noticeably less fiery than what he has had to say on Twitter and in public settings about the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un, and the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell — reflected Mr. Trump’s own thinking.

And the episode again proved the limitations of Mr. Trump’s family, which was once expected to exert a moderating influence on his presidency.

Ivanka Trump, a senior adviser to her father, used Twitter early Sunday to denounce the violence in Charlottesville, becoming the highest-ranking administration official to condemn the protesters on the record.

“There should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy and neo-nazis,” she wrote Sunday.

Glenn Thrush reported from Bridgewater, and Rebecca R. Ruiz from Washington.

  • Published in U.S.
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