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Dom Martin's vestments: Indigenized robes for worship

 

MANILA -- A collection of 60 liturgical vestments from 20 ethno-linguistic groups is currently on display at the Ayala Museum in Makati City.
The exhibit, entitled “Vested for Worship, Wrapped in Identity”, showcases the designs of Benedictine monk, Dom Martin Hizon Gomez, OSB from the Abbey of the Transfiguration in Malaybalay, Bukidnon.
Dom Martin studied at the SLIMS Fashion and Arts School from 1967-1968 and had a 22-year career as a fashion designer before entering the monastery.
The Catholic Church has quite recently adopted the concept of “enculturation”, which means that songs -- and now vestments -- can be indigenized. Vestments can make use of fabrics belonging to the cultural identity of each parish.
Amazed by the country’s rich cultural heritage, Dom Martin was prompted to ask, “We have all these beautiful materials. How come we never use them for the Church?”
Dom Martin however had to make certain that fabrics and other ornaments from the various ethno-linguistic groups in the country remain available. “If I am going to promote the use of indigenous materials, I should be assured of the supply. I know they are beautiful but do people still weave them? I might be creating a market but then all of a sudden, there might be no supply,” he said.
Acting as his own researcher and anthropologist, Dom Martin set out on a journey that would take him from his native Mindanao to the northernmost parts of Luzon in search of the best materials that would represent the ethno-linguistic groups of the Philippines.
It was a project that would take him four-and-a-half years to complete. Dom Martin traveled and studied 20 ethno-linguistic groups to make sure they are still weaving and can weave for the Church.
The monk sought the help of the Philippine Textile Research Institute (PTRI), Fiber Industry Development Authority (FIDA), and the Katutubong Pilipino Foundation, whose chairperson Margie Macasaet encouraged him to create a whole collection in time for the Philippine Centennial Celebrations in 1998.
He also checked with his embroiderers in Parañaque and Las Piñas to see if they were still around and working. They were only too glad to help with his project.
“I was very blessed that all the people I approached believed in what I wanted to do — to enculturate liturgical vestments and make them Filipino,” Dom Martin said.
In the field while doing research, Dom Martin realized how remote and inaccessible some of these indigenous groups were, for instance, the “Itneg” in Abra, which he reached after a long trek that included crossing a hanging bridge over a raging river.
“Two days later when I came home, I talked to my brother and I said, please get me an insurance policy. I did not realize this research was going to entail some danger,” he quipped.
The resulting pieces were nothing short of breathtaking. The vestments were done in a variety of fabrics, including abaca and “pinya”, and incorporated the colors of the Itneg, Gaddang, Ifugaos and many other indigenous peoples.
Each piece is totally rendered by hand. The ornaments and embroidery work are intricate and exquisite, fusing in such liturgical symbols as the cross, vines and branches.
According to Dom Martin, the simplicity of the vestments in the early days signified that the Church closely identified itself with the poor. This explains why he left out symbols on the stole --“stola” in Greek -- which means “towel”.
“You do not put symbols on top of symbols. In the early ages, all of these vestments were ordinary clothing. The stola was just a towel that the men used to wipe their faces and hands,” he explained.
”Later on, they had to put emblems and different symbols for catechetical instruction. It served its purpose in those years but at this point in time, they are not strictly necessary, which is why my stoles do not have any additional symbols.”
We have to take pride in our heritage and culture and bring this pride and culture in our liturgical celebrations, he said.
”Only then can we say that our worship has become truly Filipino. Enculturating vestments is very important because when a priest celebrates the Holy Eucharist wearing a vestment using indigenous materials, he is not only clothed for worship, he is wrapped in the Filipino identity,” Dom Martin.
The exhibit runs at the Ayala Museum until September 5. -- PNA

 
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PH economy seen facing risk of overheating

By: Ben O. de Vera - Reporter / @bendeveraINQPhilippine Daily Inquirer 

 


Singapore’s biggest bank has warned that amid robust growth, the Philippine economy is at risk of overheating.

In a report last week, DBS Ltd. said it expected the Philippines’ macro fundamentals “to remain strong, with infrastructure at the forefront of growth.”

“While growth is unlikely to surprise on the upside, progress from tax reform, infrastructure spending and a potential delay in interest rate hikes should keep sentiment positive in the market,” DBS said.


Also, DBS said that “with all eyes now set on the Philippines and how it is progressing under the Duterte administration, it is timely to look at potential growth pockets and bright spots that investors can delve into given the country’s infrastructure-driven economy.”

According to DBS, the plan to ramp up infrastructure spending will augur well for economic growth in the long-term.

Earlier qualms about political risks “should be less of a focus now as economic reforms have been rolled out,” DBS added.

However, DBS warned that “the Philippine economy is displaying early signs of overheating.”

“GDP [gross domestic product] growth has been running at close to 7 percent year-on-year for the past year. Headline CPI [consumer price index] inflation has been above 3 percent year-on-year since February, up from sub-2-percent levels a year ago. Investment growth is very strong; gross fixed capital formation expanded by more than 20 percent year-on-year in 2016,” DBS noted.

“Hence, there is a case for the [Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas] to tighten monetary policy in the coming months. The BSP has, however, refrained from lifting the policy rate. Philippine peso-market interest rates have responded by drifting higher over the past year, in contrast to flat to lower rates in many other Asian economies,” according to DBS.

“Clearly, Philippine government bonds have underperformed their Asian peers over the past few months. The carry environment has, so far, helped to contain the upside in Philippine government yields. Even so, there is a need to guard against complacency. Philippine government yields can become more volatile when monetary policy starts to address overheating risks,” the bank said.

 

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Kapatid for Marawi

NEGOSYO KAPATID: Angat Lahat By Joey Concepcion (The Philippine Star)

Saguiran Mayor Macmod Muti and Go Negosyo volunteer Joseph Castillo led the distribution of goods to all evacuees.
In this time of distress in our country caused by the recent acts of terror and violence in Marawi, we should all be one in praying that all these will be over. Marawi is the most populated city in ARMM region with more than 200,000 people including children and I do not think they deserve the danger they are experiencing for more than two weeks already.

To be able to share some hope and blessings, Go Negosyo decided to start a call for donations from our Kapatids who are all always ready to give and be part of a bigger solution.

After hearing the reports on Marawi and how our Maranao brothers needed assistance, we all sprung into action. Together with our Go Negosyo coordinator Ginggay Hontiveros, we called for the support of the big brothers. We launched the project: #KapatidForMarawi.

Numerous donations came from the following big brothers: RFM Corp., LBC led by Santi Araneta, Asia Brewery of Mike Tan, LandRover Club, SM Foundation led by Tessie Sy-Coson, Century Pacific of Chris Po, SL Agritech led by Henry Lim Bon Liong, and CDO Foodsphere of Corazon Dayro-Ong.

Medicines, pasta, milk and juices, water, canned goods, rice, and other essentials were donated by our Kapatids. Additionally, there are mats, blankets, and some clothes that are ready for distribution.

George Barcelon and Rex Daryanani led the participation of the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry and Federation of the Indian Chamber of Commerce and Industry respectively to the project.

 

 

Members of the recently launched Alliance Towards Prosperity for All such as Management Association of the Philippines, Financial Executives of the Philippines, Bankers Association of the Philippines, Makati Business Club, and others are all supportive of the Kapatid For Marawi initiative as well.

The distribution and transportation of products would have not been possible without the help of Joseph Castillo, Corporal Maglaum PA, Asec. Shalimar Candao, Operation Blessing, Angel Brigade, 4th ID Army Brigade Commander Major General Madrigal, COS Col. Andres Centino, CDO Mayor Oscar Moreno, Office of the CDO City Engineer and Paul Dominguez.

When our volunteer Joseph Castillo met some of our soldiers, he also handed some water and canned goods. I’m sure that this is just a temporary relief to our brave men but we hope this can give them additional strength.

These efforts of Go Negosyo Kapatids are part of our mission to bring prosperity alongside with our hopes of peace and harmony in Marawi City. Like our program Negosyo Para sa Kapayapaan sa Sulu, we aim to help areas experiencing extreme poverty and conflict scale up through the development programs in each area.

We are one with the government in its mission to eradicate terrorism in the country. As one nation, we should unite in supporting our soldiers, policemen, and local government units in their fight against the Maute group. We cannot progress if we are facing such issues. Without peace, there is no prosperity. We cannot start any development if the area we wish to change is troubled with armed groups.

The President and his team will surely do their best to eradicate this threat in the country. We pray for comfort to the people of Marawi. May they find relief with the goods we have sent.

For interested donors to the #KapatidForMarawi, you may get in touch with Go Negosyo coordinator Ginggay Hontiveros at 0908 898 0428 / 0917 524 9957 or Gelle Jimena 0917 312 7984 or 0999 887 9276.

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