Displaying items by tag: PNP

PNP warns against online 'kidnap-for-ransom'

MANILA -- The Philippine National PoliceAnti-Cybercrime Group (PNP-ACG) on Wednesday, March 22, warned companies in the country against ransomware, an online "kidnapping-for-ransom" modus of cybercriminals.
"Angtrending ngayon is ransonware. 'Yung they will automatically encrypt your file, para bang sa traditional may kikidnapin na tao tapos pababayaran,"Superintendent Jay Guillermo, PNP-ACG spokesperson, told reporters at the sidelines of the 4th National Summit on Cybercrime.
"They will kidnap your data, information tapos babayaran mo 'yun sa kanila for the password," he added.
He said when a data is encrypted, it cannot be accessed or opened by the owner unless they get the password.
He said those victimized by ransomware are mostly companies.
"Victimized are companies that have information, very vital yung information na 'yan. They will encrypt that file eh hindi mo s'ya mabubuksan kasi for you to open that you have to have a password," he said.
He said they are currently investigating two to three cases of ransomware in the country.
"It is already happening, but with regard tot he company wala pa namang reports.Only yung file nila it was encrypted. natakotlang sila if they (attackers) will use this information," he said.
He said attackers sometimes ask for a payment through bitcoin or cryptocurrency and an online payment system.
"Minsan two or three bit cons, mga P120,000 ang bit coin. Through virtual currency [angbayad]," he said.
Backing-up your files, regularly checking the backed up files and avoiding opening attachments on emails from anonymous senders or people you don't know are among the best preventive measures against ransomware. — GMA News

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Police chief says all criminals are liars

MANILA – The chief of the Northern Police District (NPD) downplayed complaints filed against Caloocan policemen before the Ombudsman, pointing out that it's "normal" for criminals to deny and lie about their crimes.
"The operation happened a long time ago, in September. It's normal for criminals to deny, all of them deny. They're liars," said Chief Superintendent Robert Fajardo in a phone interview with Rappler on Wednesday, March 15.
On Tuesday, March 14, the family of Luis Bonifacio filed murder and administrative complaints against Superintendent Ali Jose Duterte, chief of the NPD's District Special Operations Unit, and several other cops for supposedly murdering Bonifacio and making it seem like it was a buy-bust operation gone wrong.
They face murder and administrative complaints – gross misconduct, grave abuse of authority, gross oppression, and conduct unbecoming of a public officer.
Fajardo, who has supervision over the cities of Caloocan, Malabon, Navotas, and Valenzuela, dismissed the complaint against his men, telling Rappler that what happened in September was a legitimate operation.
"We won't ask the Ombudsman to dismiss the case outright. We will answer the case then let the Ombudsman dismiss it," he said.

Mistaken identity?
Fajardo, appointed NPD chief in July, said Bonifacio had been on the police's "watchlist" of suspected drug users and pushers. The list is prepared by barangay officials and validated by police.
Police had supposedly mistaken Luis for Luisito, his brother. Luisito was supposedly number 6 on the Caloocan police's drug list.
"The data is complete. He is part of the watchlist. The allegation about the name being wrong, about a mistaken identify… that was really him. It's normal for the family to deny," said Fajardo.
Bonifacio's family insisted that the police's narrative – as documented in the police report – isn't true.
Eyewitnesses, including his family members, claimed that Bonifacio was already on his knees with hands held in the air when police barged into their home in Bagong Barrio, Caloocan City. Police were searching for illegal drugs.
But he was supposedly shot dead by cops – unarmed and not dangerous – as his family went downstairs on the orders of police. Bonifacio's son, Gabriel Louis, was also killed because he did not leave his father's side. The incident happened at 1:30 am on September 15, 2016.
From July 1, 2016 to January 30, 2017, police tallied 7,080 deaths linked – directly or indirectly – to the bloody war on drugs. Police killed at least 2,555 in anti-drug operations.
Families of victims have accused the police of summarily killing their kin, but most of them have chosen not to file cases. The Bonifacio family's complaint is the first one filed with the Ombudsman in relation to the current war on drugs. – Rappler.com
Police chief says all criminals are liars

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Advice to Duterte: Don't micromanage PNP

MANILA – Did President Rodrigo Duterte “micromanage” the police when he intervened in the re-appointment of a cop who later led an operation that resulted in the death of a suspected drug lord?
According to a joint senate committee report on the killing of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa, Sr., Duterte should “not be micromanaging the affairs of the government and should place his trust in the sound discretion of all his appointee, including [Philippine National Police chief Ronald dela Rosa]." The report was released on Monday, March 13, almost 4 months after Espinosa was killed inside his own jail cell.
Espinosa was killed on November 5, 2016, in what operatives from the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) Region 8 claim was an operation to serve a search warrant against the mayor and another inmate.
He allegedly had guns and illegal drugs inside prison. Cops claimed he shot at cops during the operation, which eventually resulted in his death.
But that version of the story has been disputed by PNP officials, the National Bureau of Investigation, and the Senate committees on public order and dangerous drugs and on justice and human rights.
Former CIDG 8 chief Superintendent Marvin Marcos, his men, and some personnel of the local Maritime Group allegedly planned the killing of Marcos, mainly to rid all traces of their supposed ties to the illegal drugs network in Eastern Visayas.
Espinosa was among the first chief executives that Duterte accused of having ties to illegal drugs. His son, Kerwin, is an alleged drug lord.

Duterte's hand
But Duterte’s ties to the case became more complicated after it was revealed that Dela Rosa had ordered Marcos relieved prior to the jail incident, based on reports he was linked to drugs. The PNP chief’s plans, however, were thwarted when a “higher up” intervened.
After a few days of refusing to name the “higher up,” Duterte admitted that he stopped the relief of Marcos, supposedly because he was investigating the cop’s ties to illegal drugs.
“The Chief [of the PNP] should be given full authority and control on how he will manage the day-to-day affairs of the organization subject to the limitations set by law. He should be given a free hand to decide on how to run the PNP and his decisions should be recognized and respected and should be countermanded or reversed only by the Chief Executive in case of a clear showing of grave abuse of discretion of the part of the Chief, PNP,” read the Senate report, which was submitted and sponsored by Senator Panfilo Lacson, a former chief of the police force.

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