Lisa’s life in the balance

In a previous issue, Philippine News revealed the plight of  Lisa Marie Evangelista, a 31-year-old Filipina woman who lives in Sacramento, who is in a literal fight for her life.On Dec. 27, 2016, she was diagnosed with Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, a rare and aggressive blood cancer. She needs a bone marrow transplant to survive. Lisa’s sister is a 5/10 or half match. However, doctors prefer Lisa find a 10/10-donor match. To find a perfect match, Lisa needs a stranger to step forward and help save her life.Lisa has partnered with the Asian American Donor Program to find a donor similar to her genetic makeup. A bone marrow transplant, which is needed soon, is Lisa’s only hope for her long-term survival. A committed 10/10 marrow-matching donor must be located to have a successful transplant. Since Lisa is of Filipino, a matching donor will also need to be of Filipino or Asian descent.Shortage of Ethnic/Multi-Ethnic DonorsApproximately  every  3  minutes  one person in the  United States  is  diagnosed with a blood cancer. An estimated combined total of 172,910 people in the US are expected to be  diagnosed  with  leukemia,  lymphoma  or  myeloma  in  2017.  New  cases  of  leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma are expected to account for 10.2 percent of the estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases diagnosed in the US in 2017.Of  the  approximately  816,000  Asians  on  the  Be  the  Match®  registry, .5  percent are Filipinos, while Filipino Americans constitute 19.7 percent of Asian Americans (Source: 2010  Census).  The  Be  The  Match®  registry  recruits  hundreds  of  thousands  of  donors each year through an extensive network of more than 155 local and regional Community Engagement Representatives and organizations. You only need to join the Be The Match® registry once.“Finding a marrow/stem cell match can be like finding a needle in a haystack,” says Gillespie.    “Multi-racial  patients  face  the  worst  odds.    Those  diagnosed  with  a  blood disease need a marrow/stem cell transplant as soon as possible. Building the Registry with committed donors is what patients need. You could potentially match anyone in the world, this is truly a global effort.” How You Can Commit to Help• Findaregistrationdriveinyourarea.Gotohttp://www.aadp.org/drive/• Registeronlinehere:https://join.bethematch.org/lisaYou must be 18 to 44 years old and meet general health requirements• Filloutaconsentformanddoacheekswab• Becommitted.Bereadytodonatetoanypatientinneed• Contactfriends/familyandencouragethemtogotoaregistrationdriveorregisteronline• Setupadriveinyourareaorformoreinformation,callAADPat1-800-593-6667or visit our website http://www.aadp.org• VolunteertohelpatregistrationdrivesPlease take a few minutes of your time to learn more about how you can help save a lifeand register as a marrow donor.Upcoming Registration DriveSoy and Tofu FestivalSaturday, June 17 from 11am to 5 pmOpen to the PublicSaint Mary’s Cathedral, 1111 Gough St., San Francisco, CA 94109Malayan SF Outdoor FestivalPhilippine Independence DaySunday, June 18 from noon to 8 pmUnion Square, 333 Post St., San Francisco, 941025:30 pm Free ConcertThe Asian American Donor Program (AADP), with its offices in the San Francisco Bay Area, is dedicated to increasing the availability of potential stem cell donors for patients with life threatening diseases curable by a blood stem cell or marrow transplant. AADP  is  a  community-based  nonprofit  for  social  benefit  (501©3)  organization  and specializes  in  conducting  outreach  and  donor  registration  drives  in  and  with  diverse communities. AADP is an official recruitment center of the Be The Match® registry. To  learn  more about  scheduled  upcoming  marrow  drives,  visit  http://www.aadp.org/drive/

Syjuco and Collins Team Up Again with Almost Sunrise

Syjuco and Collins Team Up Again with Almost Sunrise 
By Cristina Osmeña
 
 
Next month, it will be 30 years since the double rape and homicide of sisters Marijoy and Jacqueline Chiong in Cebu, Philippines changed the landscape of my family’s grief.  My second cousin, Paco Osmeña Larrañaga, was arrested and convicted of this crime and sentenced to death despite overwhelming evidence that he was enjoying the night with two dozen friends at a bar in Manila.  Yet, despite an extensive collection of relatives connected to government, some who were in positions to have spoken for him more proactively, it was Manila-born Marty Syjuco who decided to do something for his brother-in-law.  (Syjuco’s brother is married to Larrañaga’s sister.)
 
Marty Syjuco and Michael Collins (director) made a widely acclaimed documentary called Give Up Tomorrow.  The documentary won 10 film awards, including the Audience Award at the 2011 TriBeCa Film Festival, and received nominations for countless others.  While the film called much attention to Paco’s plight, it did not result in a revocation of the guilty verdict.  However, the attendant impact campaign, Free Paco Now, swelled public sympathy for his release and catalyzed the abolition of the death penalty in the Philippines.
 

New film warns: Hepatitis-B common among Asian Americans

New film warns: Hepatitis-B common among Asian Americans

Be About It by Christopher Wong screened on May 11 at University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, followed by a panel discussion.

Wong described his own lack of awareness of the disease and its prevalence before making the film: “The funny thing was that I was not aware of the disease myself. I didn’t know that it even had to do with the liver; that’s how uninformed I was. So when I started to dig deeper I was really shocked by the fact that over 50 percent of the cases are people of Asian descent. That really made me interested.”

Be About It is the story of two Asian fathers, their families and their reality of living with hepatitis-B, a potentially deadly disease that affects approximately one million Asian Americans.
Hep B, caused by the hepatitis B virus, can result in serious liver problems before symptoms become noticeable and is frequently referred to as a “silent killer.” Up to two million people are infected in the U.S., and as many as two out of three Asian Americans living with it aren’t aware they have it. Often stigmatized and misunderstood, hep B is the most common cause of liver cancer among Asian Americans.

Hep B is caused by a virus that is transmitted via blood and other bodily fluids. Hep B can be managed, and the disease can be prevented – but if left untreated, the complications of hep B can potentially be life threatening.

As Asian immigrants are projected to be the largest immigrant population in the country over the next 40 years, the need to call attention to this so-called “silent” disease is more critical than ever. The good news is that hep B can easily be detected with a quick and simple blood test. Everyone should talk to their doctor about getting tested – especially if you are of Asian descent.
If you test negative for hep B, there is a safe and effective vaccine that can prevent hep B, and it is widely available in the United States. If you test positive for hep B, talk to your doctor about whether treatment would be appropriate for you. Regular screenings to monitor the health of your liver are very important, and there are treatments that may potentially lower the amount of virus and decrease the risk of further damage to the liver – some are just one pill a day.
So on Hepatitis Testing Day on May 19, join millions of Asians here in the United States and around the globe and get tested for hepatitis B.
Visit hepBsmart.com for information about chronic hepatitis B, and to learn about the documentary film short BE ABOUT IT, sponsored by Gilead Sciences, which chronicles the lives of two Asian Americans, Alan and AJ, as they battle chronic hepatitis B, and how their families cope with the impact of this potentially life-threatening disease. The film aims to educate, inspire and ultimately dispel myths about hepatitis B. BE ABOUT IT is subtitled in Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese and Japanese, and community screening kits are now available.

  • Published in Health

PECHANGA CELEBRATES MIDWAY POINT OF $285 MILLION RESORT EXPANSION WITH TOPPING OUT CEREMONY

A major milestone in the construction of the $285 million Pechanga Resort & Casino expansion was reached today. Dozens of construction members, elected officials, dignitaries, Pechanga Tribal members and Pechanga Team Members gathered to watch the topping out of the Tribe's massive addition that will make their resort/casino the largest on the West Coast. The mammoth expansion is now more than halfway complete.

This topping out included crews 14 stories up pouring the last 710 tons of concrete into the upper framing of the new hotel tower that will house 568 rooms and suites. A giant, concrete-filled bucket the size of a mid-size car was hoisted via crane to the top of the south hotel wing and its contents poured into the structure. A small, sacred oak tree also hitched a ride onto the top of building with the bucket, and was placed atop the tower as a symbol of strength and perseverance. The ceremonial tree will be planted on the resort grounds at the expansion's completion.

"Countless people, as well as more than 2,500 construction trades workers, have labored tirelessly to keep construction on schedule allowing us to celebrate today. This is the very spot new and existing visitors to Temecula and Pechanga will have their first impressions of our new resort come December. On this important day, we can look confidently toward our Tribe's and the Temecula Valley's future," said Edith Atwood, President of the Pechanga Development Corporation.

The project put more than 2,500 regional construction tradesmen and women to work for the two-year build. Materials used in construction have been largely sourced from Southern California. Builders have poured 81,000 tons of concrete to erect the Pechanga resort expansion's new hotel wing. More than 2,174 tons of reinforcing steel went into the structure, The base of the intersecting hotel towers is 70-feet wide and 13-feet deep with a large tunnel system allowing the more than 4,500 Pechanga Team Members to move easily through the property for the most efficient guest service. The hotel structure ascends 13 stories on the south and nine stories on the north.

 

When the entire expansion project is complete in December 2017, Pechanga Resort & Casino will offer a full-scale destination experience to visitors coming from California and beyond.

Snapshot of Pechanga When Expansion is Complete:
* Casino Square Footage: 200,000
* Event/Meeting/Convention square footage: 100,000 (indoor) 174,500 (outdoor)
* Number of Hotel Rooms: 1,090
* Number of Restaurants: 13
* Number of Pools & Spas: 13
* Number of Employees: 4,560
* Other Amenities: 2-level luxury Spa, Fitness Center, Championship 18-hole Golf Course, Concert Theater, Nightlife, Green Roof

The building was designed by Delawie architects, the original designers of Pechanga Resort & Casino when it was built in 2002. Lifescapes International is building the four-acre pool complex. Tutor Perini was selected as the expansion builder. CLEO Design is the lead for interior aesthetics.

 

 

Pic Captions :

Image 1 : Asian Medias interviewing Mr. Lee Torres - General Manager of Pechanga Resort & Casino

Image 2 : Pechanga Tribal Councils & Members

Image 3: Sacred oak tree lifting onto the top of building with the bucket, and was placed atop the tower as a symbol of strength and perseverance.

 

 

About Pechanga Resort & Casino 


Pechanga Resort & Casino offers one of the largest and most expansive resort/casino experiences anywhere in the United States. Voted the Number One casino in America by readers of USA TODAY and rated a Four Diamond property by AAA since 2002, Pechanga Resort & Casino provides an unparalleled getaway. Offering more than 3,400 of the hottest slots, table games, world-class entertainment, 517 hotel rooms, dining, spa and championship golf at Journey at Pechanga, Pechanga Resort & Casino features a destination that meets and exceeds the needs of its guests and the community. Pechanga Resort & Casino is owned and operated by the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. For more information, call toll free 1-888-PECHANGA or visit www.Pechanga.com. Follow Pechanga Resort & Casino on Facebook <http://www.facebook.com/pechanga> and on Twitter @PechangaCasino <http://twitter.com/pechangacasino>. Pechanga Resort & Casino is open 24-hours. Guests must be 21 and older to enter the casino. 
 

 
 
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