A silent fear exists among leaders of both parties: Disaster will fill the air should Trump fire Mueller

When interviewed by the responsible media, Republicans did not hide their beliefs about any move by POTUS to fire special counsel Robert Mueller would form a ‘political disaster.’

 

 

Echoing a major voice among GOP figures, although they’ve professed their loyalty to Trump, they did not hesitate in responding to queries that such a move against retaining Mueller would be ‘hugely counterproductive.”

 

Most vocal among the naysayers are those in preparation and those who look forward to November’s midterm elections.

One such voice declared: “The president would make already-difficult terrain close to impossible,” as he was heard on TV most firmly as a non-candidate.

 

He continued to vent his opposition: “I think it would be a really bad idea to fire him (referring to Mueller) and exacerbate the situation without question.”

 

The same opinion was echoed by Doug Haye, a former communications director of the Republican National Committee who has been identified as a critical voice.

Haye said: “The president and his party should fight Democrats on the grounds of “how many jobs were created, what is the unemployment rate and who gets the credit for it?”

 

He strengthened his rationale by saying: “That’s a much better place, as opposed to “did you or did you not obstruct justice?”

 

A great many opinions against POTUS continues to surface as speculation about the firing of FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe was recently concluded.

 

Once again, more negatives were underscored against Trump’s crude manner of expressing his views.

 

In the firing’s wake, Trump assumed a most ‘combative tone,’ as listeners compared him to what was ‘usual.’

 

The following took place as bases for the talk that didn’t seem to end: Trump took a very error-laden attitude in name-checking that the special counsel’s team has “13 hardened Democrats.”

 

Despite the well-known fact that Mueller himself is a registered Republican, nominated to the position he held at the FBI, no prohibition of any sort has surfaced that would be deemed “political” from the targets of the investigators..

 

A former member of the Trump legal team, John Dowd, emphasized that the Mueller investigation should be brought to an end ‘very soon.’

 

When asked if he was speaking as a member of the Trump legal group, Dowd informed his listeners that he was only speaking in a personal capacity. At first, he sided with Trump. When Dowd left the legal team, he did not care whose side he was on.

 

There’s no secret involved in talking about the Trump legal team.  The ones who were identified as “big names” in the field refused to join the team. To date, only a pair of lawyers are

on the Trump team.

 

Many on the Trump side of the fence are non-lawyers who had vented their frustration consuming the length of time the Mueller investigation has been going on and deplore the absence of ‘clear evidence’ of no collusion with Russia made public.

.

Loyalists like Michael Caputo, have not hidden any assertions that the root of frustration lies in the slowness of the Mueller probe. Caputo expressed his source of irritation which he declared

was likewise indicated by Trump.

.

“Everyone is extremely frustrated — those of us who support the president and the people who want to get the agenda moving forward and they can’t,” Caputo emphasized.

 

Yet, there are GOP voices that have displayed how skeptical they are of Trump. One distinct argument: “The president makes his own trouble and distracts from his party’s policies.”

 

Sensible Republican lawmakers have sought vigorous reasoning on their stand.  A formidable voice came from Senator Lindsey Graham who did not hesitate at all to say how any effort to oust Mueller would be the “beginning of the end of the Trump presidency.”

 

Some Republicans sided with Graham’s strong statement., and proceeded to be vocal in their rationale.

“There is no appetite among the Republican establishment to remove Mueller.  If the president removes him, he could be impeached,” is commonly heard and excuses do not abound when made emphatic.

Meanwhile, the state of Washington has led in signing the universal voter registration law.

The aforementioned legislation has been largely hailed as vital for the future as more and more youthful potential voters have expressed how eager they are to exercise their right to vote.

What does appear as significant is a measure that would require the state Department of Licensing to automatically register citizens obtaining a driver’s license or identification to vote.

It will be recalled that Washington is the tenth state to implement automatic voter registration in but the past four years, according to the Brennan Center of Justice.

The aforesaid voter registration has been received with vast approvals from all who wish to cast their vote as members of a democracy.

Another state, Oregon, the first one to automatically register voters, announced how it has added nearly a quarter million new voters to its rolls in just the first year the program commenced its operation in 2015.

California has given its estimates in reference to how it will add as many as 6.5 million new voters to the rolls.

Doesn’t the future look rosy when it comes to more and more voices that will declare their choices via their vote as part of a democracy that isn’t just in name only, but  likewise in deed?