It was called a “Bitter Battle” when Kavanaugh’s appearance came through in his ascent to the Supreme Court

When the vote “50-48” was announced, it moved Brett Cavanaugh to the position he aimed at: Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States.

 

 

 

This columnist recalls a saying she’s read from a well-known sportswriter:  “It’s not whether you win or lose, it’s how you play the game.”

 

How true!  It seems that the aforementioned statement that has lent credence to the ascent of Cavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court is so apropos!

 

The newest addition to the highest court in the land referred greatly to his past performances, therefore, he should know the country’s sports world’s principles/

 

That aforesaid dictum underscoring how one “plays the game,” is on target, and will continue to be a reminder to Cavanaugh himself.

 

As a part of his autobiography, Cavanaugh knew that as an athlete and a coach, he would observe the decorum practiced and respected, but did he, when it came to his appearance at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing?

 

Just to recall the Cavanaugh “appearance,” as brought by television coverage: Isn’t it indisputable that he lied multiple times to the very same Senate Committee?

Any unbiased observer of the same hearing would feel how Kavanaugh’s angry and hateful outbursts, replete with hostile and unproven accusations would not

hesitate to call that particular September 27th hearing as embarrassingly undignified.

Yet, none of the absolute surges of accusatory language was ever equated in the Kavanaugh confirmation.

Kavanaugh made the ascent he had long wished for, over and above,  his unbecoming behavior.

What bothers this columnist is how a Supreme Court nominee would simply underscore his education, credentials, experience, integrity, any favorable description

about himself, just to arrive at the position he aimed for.

How did any such similar confirmation hearings of the past evolve?

If there were any untoward and angry responses, the word would have gotten out and the American people would be the first to deplore such undesirable actions.

The media brought out the truth about the backstage maneuvering of the Kavanaugh confirmation.

If one report branded the Kavanaugh testimony “sordid,” it was justifiable in the midst of all that hateful display of a would-be justice aiming for a position in the highest court of the U.S. as unbecoming.

Who among our gender who testified about their victimization wouldn’t feel heartbroken about the Kavanaugh ascent to the highest court of the land?

Regardless of how any citizen of this country feels about whether Kavanaugh deserves his place on the Supreme Court, the cause for alarm cannot be ignored.

The secrecy shrouding the process is what led to his nomination.

News reports have been punctual in letting the American populace know how the White House is withholding more than 100,000 pages of records from the newly-

appointed Justice Kavanaugh’s tenure as a lawyer in the George W. Bush administration.  Senate Republicans have strongly refused to release even scant information from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) into sexual abuse allegations against Kavanaugh.

The American people have a right to know what their public officials and agencies are doing and the bases for their action.

Isn’t a deprival of information that should be known by the populace a means by which democracy is in grave peril?

In the meantime, the address Senator Susan Collins made that pushed Kavanaugh where he is earning his daily bread today will not be forgotten.

The Collins’ speech in the Senate was “breathtaking in its dishonesty.”

The same address ignored the scores of people who expressed their desire to talk to the FBI about Kavanaugh’s reported heavy drinking to the point of blacking out. Those women who were willing to testify against the newly-appointed jurist were never interviewed.

Some news analysts call the supposed investigations that were never revealed attempts at “whitewash.”

Regardless of how one feels about whether Brett Kavanaugh should continue to sit on the Supreme Court, there will be that perennial cause for alarm.

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